What is a social pragmatic communication disorder

Contribution from former user »

I have mixed feelings about the new diagnosis of "social communication disorder". On the one hand, it has something of an "art diagnosis", where one can ask oneself: what is that supposed to be? To what extent is the underlying clinical picture even validated? What theories are there about the causes, the etiology and what therapies are intended for this? In many cases, isn't there a form of autism behind the "social communication disorder" that is only more subtle and hidden than one would normally expect?

On the other hand, the new diagnosis (so the proponents argue as far as I know) that people who are not sufficiently diagnosed with ASD can get a diagnosis at all - and are therefore entitled to help from the health and social systems.

Especially people who have previously been certified as having "autistic traits" or subclinical autism (BAP = Broader autism phenotype) (for whom it was never enough for an official ASD diagnosis) can hope that they will have a "social communication disorder" Received a diagnosis that recognizes their difficulties to some extent and does not dismiss them as just imagination or madness. Many of these "subliminal autistics" had to go home empty-handed (RW) and were not entitled to any help from the health service without a diagnosis.

To Carola: First of all, I would see the positive: The doctor has at least recognized that your son has certain problems that he takes seriously and that apparently also have disease value. Perhaps the "social communication disorder" already entitles you to therapies, integration aids or other measures from which your son can benefit, I would definitely inquire about that.

So: You now have a diagnosis after all, that's a lot better than nothing at all. If you are not convinced by the "social communication disorder" and you continue to suspect that your son has ASD after all, then I would consider presenting him to another specialist or other specialist clinic to get a second opinion.

You may also consider waiting first and not having your son checked again for a year or two. Then he will be older and his difficulties may then also show up in a different way than they are today. Perhaps the reassessment will also give a different picture and it may still be enough for an ASD diagnosis. You may also consider waiting first and not having your son checked again for a year or two. Then he will be older and his difficulties may then also show up in a different way than they are today. Perhaps the reassessment will also give a different picture and it may still be enough for an ASD diagnosis after all. Perhaps that is not necessary at all if your son - in the best case - also gets the appropriate help that he needs with the current diagnosis. In the end, that's the point that matters.