How can I learn guitar modes quickly

Learn to play the guitar at the same time as the ukulele?
  • 04/24/14, April, 2014, 11:42:24
    Hi Guys ;-)

    I've been playing the ukulele since last September and can already play a lot of songs (chord playing)
    But since I am also interested in guitar, I wanted to know whether it would be advisable to learn the 2 instruments at the same time? or do you get confused?
    I have a very cheap plywood guitar at home that I've tried to pick up the most important chords on. Everything works quite well, except for F major .... when I try to grab F my fingers get crooked (mainly the small one).

    Another question is: are the fret sizes for guitars standardized or can you also find some with smaller frets? I can only get over 3 frets with my fingers ...

    And last but not least: how much would I have to invest to get a good guitar that I still enjoy playing years later?

    Hope there are a few people among you who can play the guitar and give you a few tips
  • 04/24/14, April, 2014, 11:57:55
    Ukulele and guitar are not that different Of course you can learn them in parallel. At first you will probably get confused with the different moods, but that resolved relatively quickly for me. After about 2 weeks I had it in there.

    The distance between the frets depends on the scale length (= length of the free-swinging string). With acoustic guitars this is usually around 65cm. The manufacturer is completely irrelevant. If the scale length is the same, the fret spacing is also the same. The guitars from Gretsch usually have a slightly shorter scale length and thus also a little smaller fret spacing, maybe there are other manufacturers who deviate slightly, but now I only know Gretsch spontaneously. There are guitars with a shorter scale length (7/8, 3/4, 1/2, 1/4) and of course the distances are correspondingly smaller. These sizes, which are also often referred to as \ "children's guitars \", are more widespread in the field of concert guitars (nylon strings), and they are relatively rare in western guitars (steel strings). Martin has \ "Little Martin \" and Taylor \ "Baby Taylor \" to name two.

    If you want, you can bring the smaller sizes to an ADGCEA tuning with the appropriate strings and then play the fingerings as you would on a ukulele, you just "only" have to operate the two bass strings.



    P.S .: I deliberately left out \ "special sizes \" such as baritone, octave or fifth guitars.
  • 04/24/14, April, 2014, 12:13:24
    How about a guitar lele to start with? The one from Yamaha shouldn't be bad and you have the same grips as with a Uke, only two additional strings ...
  • 04/24/14, April, 2014, 12:14:37
    I've been learning guitar for a few years, and now also ukulele at the same time ... common instrument sizes and common moods, no tricks with moods to artificially create similarities ... that's no problem at all. The necessary finger stretching comes naturally when you practice.
    But you should also play both REGULARLY so that you feel safe and comfortable on both.
  • 04/24/14, April, 2014, 12:15:48
    Hello Speedy!

    I don't find it problematic to learn guitar in addition to the ukulele. Since the instruments \ "feel \" very different, I personally don't have any problems with confusion. Then you are in \ "guitar mode \". As for the scale length, Guchot has already explained everything.

    There are so-called "guitaleles", which are about the size of a tenor ukulele and have the same fret spacing. However, a Guitalele has 6 strings, which are tuned according to the same principle as a guitar, only a fourth higher - thus the 4 high strings correspond to a ukulele with Low-G, but you still have 2 additional "bass strings" so to speak. ". The Yamaha Guitalele is inexpensive and fun, but I think the string spacing is a bit tight.

    I would rather use a \ "real \" guitar. In my opinion, a properly playable guitar can be got for about 200 euros, the selection is absolutely gigantic and I cannot give a qualified recommendation, except that you should compare in the music shop whether you like playability and sound ... Of course, there is also back A lot of leeway above and below.

    Best wishes
    Wilfried
  • 04/24/14, April, 2014, 12:24:44

    ... Are \ "children's guitars \" also played by adults, or are they actually only made for children? I mean, I'm 22 years old now, I don't think I'll pass as a child anymore ...


    Who wants to forbid you to play a \ "children's guitar \"? You don't have to present a child's ID when buying: mrgreen: I have guitars with a 54cm, 56cm and 58cm scale and with my 47 years, 1.90m tall and just under 120 kilos, I no longer pass it as a child

    However, I would absolutely agree and continue practicing on a \ "real \" guitar first. Only when it turns out that it really doesn't work, I would switch to a smaller size. Reason: The selection is much larger and you can quickly grab your existing guitar from friends or something.

    For me it's pure convenience. I don't play guitar that often and then I don't feel like getting used to the longer scale length and the different mood. But in the end I am more of a bad example read a good one
  • 04/24/14, April, 2014, 12:43:02

    I don't find it problematic to learn guitar in addition to the ukulele. Since the instruments \ "feel \" very different, I personally do not have any problems with confusion. Then you are in \ "guitar mode

    It is exactly like that. \ "Guitar mode \", I think that's well put ... you simply switch between \ "guitar mode \" and \ "ukulele mode \", it works automatically.


    Who wants to forbid you to play a \ "children's guitar \"? You don't have to present a child's ID when buying: mrgreen: I have guitars with a 54cm, 56cm and 58cm scale and with my 47 years, 1.90m tall and just under 120 kilos, I no longer pass it as a child
    However, I would absolutely agree and continue practicing on a \ "real \" guitar first. Only when it turns out that it really doesn't work, I would switch to a smaller size. Reason: The selection is much larger and you can quickly grab your existing guitar from friends or something.

    I've also played my grandson's children's guitar ... it sounds and plays nice, but for regular use I would prefer you the normal size, because I feel much more comfortable.

    I have had a Guitarlele for some time (Yamaha, sounds amazingly good for such an inexpensive, simple instrument) ... but I only use it for example. B. to try something quietly spontaneously at night without disturbing anyone ... otherwise see above, it is too small for me to play guitar like a guitar. I'll probably sell them again.
  • 04/24/14, April, 2014, 12:45:18


    ... Are \ "children's guitars \" also played by adults, or are they actually only made for children? I mean, I'm 22 years old now, I don't think I'll pass as a child anymore ...


    Who wants to forbid you to play a \ "children's guitar \"? You don't have to present a child's ID when buying: mrgreen: I have guitars with a 54cm, 56cm and 58cm scale and with my 47 years, 1.90m tall and just under 120 kilos, I no longer pass it as a child



    I suppose

    I'll probably go to a music store soon and get advice. I've also heard of the guitarlele, but I wanted to learn on a normal one, because I think you are more flexible and later, if you feel like it, you could spontaneously switch to an electric guitar

    Thanks also to everyone else for the helpful tips

    lg
  • 04/24/14, April, 2014, 12:49:05

    that's no problem at all. The necessary finger stretch comes naturally when you practice.
    But you should also play both REGULARLY so that you feel safe and comfortable on both.

    * sign *
    I got my first guitar when I was 12 and had one full size right from the start. The barre handles took some time, but practice really makes perfect here. Even today I am not particularly tall (1.70), have rather small hands and have no problems grasping.
  • 04/24/14, April, 2014, 14:08:20

    I'll probably go to a music store soon and get advice. I've also heard of the guitarlele, but I wanted to learn on a normal one, because I think you are more flexible and later, if you feel like it, you could spontaneously switch to an electric guitar

    Above all, you have to decide whether you want a steel string guitar or a nylon one. That depends on your taste, but also on the music you want to play.
    And there are also different designs and sizes for the normal guitar sizes, from the handy Parlor bist to the gigantic Jumbo, with this of course also differences in the scale length ... especially important with the steel strings with their larger pull, with shorter lengths you need a lot less force.
  • 04/24/14, April, 2014, 17:39:18


    I'll probably go to a music store soon and get advice. I've also heard of the guitarlele, but I wanted to learn on a normal one, because I think you are more flexible and later, if you feel like it, you could spontaneously switch to an electric guitar

    Above all, you have to decide whether you want a steel string guitar or a nylon one. That depends on your taste, but also on the music you want to play.
    And there are also different designs and sizes for the normal guitar sizes, from the handy Parlor bist to the gigantic Jumbo, with this of course also differences in the scale length ... especially important with the steel strings with their larger pull, with shorter lengths you need a lot less force.


    At the moment I tend more towards a western guitar. In terms of sound, I like both of them. But I think the design of the western is simply more beautiful and the wide neck of a concert bothers me a bit (I heard that the strings are closer to each other on western guitars, so to speak, the neck is narrower) I don't know to what extent this is easier or harder to play! ?) I have long, thin fingers =) and I already have calluses thanks to my uke
  • 04/24/14, April, 2014, 18:25:34
    If you tend to use the electric guitar anyway, why not get started with it? In my opinion, the electric guitar is underestimated as an entry-level instrument. A decent electric guitar has a great action of the strings and is, in my opinion, more comfortable to play than a western guitar. It doesn't have to cost more either. Nobody is annoyed when you practice with headphones, and the achievable sound spectrum is considerable.

    Have fun anyway, no matter what it will be. By the way: There are also ukulele basses. (If it is mainly about low notes. )

    Best wishes
    Wilfried
  • 04/24/14, April, 2014, 18:36:34

    At the moment I tend more towards a western guitar. In terms of sound, I like both of them. But I think the design of the western is simply more beautiful and I am a bit annoyed by the wide neck of a concert (I've heard that the strings are closer to each other on western guitars, so to speak, the neck is narrower) I don't know to what extent this is easier or harder to play! ?) I have long, thin fingers =) and I already have calluses thanks to my uke

    Especially with the western guitars there are also nice small sizes with a slightly shorter scale, such as. B. the already mentioned Parlor types.
    Necks come in wide and narrow, thick and thin ... it depends on the style of play:
    For strumming and more modern melody playing, you usually use narrower and slimmer necks, usually 42 mm wide. For fingerstyle play, you usually use wider necks, often with a slightly stronger profile, around 44 to 48 mm wide. A good compromise between the two worlds are 43 necks with a rather slim profile. I myself (finger picker) feel most comfortable with 44 mm, with a rather slim profile. My two widest are 46 and 48 mm and relatively thick (types based on old designs) ... but I would not recommend them to a beginner.
  • 04/25/14, April, 2014, 15:49:04
    So I'm back and I'm really satisfied

    Since I can't play the guitar myself, I took various models in my price range into my head and only grabbed and played a few chords that I was still able to play, but then had the seller play something for me in order to better assess the sound ;-)

    The last time I pondered between a Takamine for 274 € and a Sigma for 215 €. Both were comfortable to hold.
    In the end, I liked the slightly bass-heavy sound of the Sigma DM-1ST a little better ... I'm really happy. I've already jumbled around a bit. now it's about finding a decent workshop (online / or book).
    Maybe someone has a tip !? So when it comes to guitar, I'm a complete newbie. I know beat patterns and something about the ukulele but well ;-)

    Lg and thanks again =)