Why are BMW 328i used so cheaply

Hello BMW fans,
I'm new here from Austria and I'm 23 years old. 2.5 years ago I bought a Mercedes w204 c220 cdi BJ: 2011 Facelift.
Since I am not entirely satisfied with the horsepower of the Mercedes, I am thinking of exchanging the car in the next few weeks or months.
Actually, I also have a second reason, namely that I would like to switch to a gasoline engine. For me, the first would be the 328i F30
come, but after reading so many negative things about the sound I became a little unsure whether it would be the right decision.
Many think it sounds like a vacuum cleaner, even a diesel is better than that. What also makes me so unsure is that it is a 4 cylinder
With a lot of horsepower and a displacement of only 2 liters, isn't the engine a little overloaded? I only ask this because I don't really know about engines etc ... give
I would have a second choice, of course, this would actually be rather reluctant for me but I'll say it anyway, E90 330i or again a Mercedes C300, but i-how I prefer a BMW more because Mercedes are priced a bit too expensive.
In terms of the interior, I prefer the Mercedes, but the F30s don't look too bad and the F30 also has a very nice sporty shape. So now I have a few questions for the specialists.

How good is the engine of the F30 328i?
How long would the lifespan be moderate? (with normal driving style, with a warm engine of course turn it up every now and then)
Does the car i-which diseases have too much oil, etc.?
Is the sound really that crappy?

What do you think of the 330i E90?
The engine of the F30 328i pulls in well and turns very nicely. Technically pretty good.

About the sound ... well what can you say big 2L 4 cylinder says everything, right? :(
With that much horsepower, it should be able to pull well, but I'm just wondering if this engine will also have a long service life, not that it will end at 180,000-200,000. I just ask myself whether the 328i is not too overloaded with 2 liters of displacement and so much horsepower.
What do you like so much? A F30 335i would be awesome, but it's too expensive for me. What do you think of the E90 330i? good engine?
they actually run very well even with high mileage, at least the 4 from our club do it.

As for the stability of the F30 328i, I cannot give you any information, but I am rather skeptical about such supercharged engines.
If I'm not mistaken, the "engine sound" of the F30 328i comes artificially from the stereo system?!?

The F30 understeers a lot. I don't know if this is important to you if you've driven Benz up to now. It's not exactly the benchmark when it comes to sportiness.

Personally, I would prefer an in-line six-cylinder vacuum cleaner (i.e. the E90 330i), but that's also a matter of taste. Since you come from diesel, the F30 328i as a turbo gasoline engine will be more similar to the E90 330i. A vacuum cleaner just wants speed, but it also turns up freely.

greetings
ChrisH
"An adequate driver is also useful here - possibly from the Porsche warehouse. A good car fairy could have whispered three words in his ear: What more for?"

Quote from the test of the BMW 323ti, AMS, issue 20/1997
Many thanks for your response. Why would you prefer a teat? I always thought that turbo cars were more preferred. Well, since I'm pretty unsure about the 328, I would also prefer a 330 (e90) for technical reasons, but I really liked the inside of the f30, especially the gear knob (automatic) looks really cool like a joystick. Has anyone ever had any experience with 328?
Nice cars start with "B" - BMW and Borsche ...
Whereby the 323i, like the 328i, both as E9 * are only the US versions (or Canada and other countries) of the 325i and 330i.
So "actually" not available from us.

I absolutely CANNOT recommend the 325i to you.
Especially when it comes with the Steptronic.
In Austria taxes are based on PS, not on engine size, so I would take the 330i.
If you want a turbo, the 335i E9 *.
I don't think much of the F models, but I haven't really found out anything about them myself.

Since you talk so much about performance, it comes about through speed and torque.
In terms of performance and, above all, the speed range, the 328i will be above the 330i thanks to the turbo, but the 330i has a more robust 6-cylinder vacuum cleaner.
I don't really like 4 cylinder BMW because other manufacturers ala VW can do better.
In terms of consumption, the F3 * will probably treat itself a little less, depending on your driving style.

The output per liter for the 328i F30 is approx. 123 HP / L, for the 330i E90 LCI it is 90 HP / L.
As a comparison, the E46 M3 ~ 105Ps / L and was pretty well served by it at the time.
Compared to a modern turbo engine, AMG 2-liter turbo ~ 180Hp / L, it is still moderate.

So in conclusion, if you have the money and
- want something modern, 328i F3 *
- Want performance and sound, 335i E9 *
- you want something in between, 330i E9 *
In terms of price, the listing should also be correct.

For modern engines, BMW assumes a lifetime of approx. 150-200tkm.
What comes out in the end depends on the driver and the love for material conservation.

The sound is okay for a 2 liter TURBO.
It is just tricked so that something else is suggested to the driver that corresponds to reality.
Sound is definitely nicer with the 3 liters. , should also give people who like the toilet flushing noise.

If it should be a diesel, I can only recommend the 330d E9 *, I can only advise against the 4 cylinder turbo diesel.
I hardly know anyone who has not had any problems with it!
The 330d, on the other hand, runs and runs and runs, VFL and the LCI.

A speedy 3 is always fun.
Yes, he does ChrisH, was allowed to hear it himself ... :(

If I'm not mistaken, the "engine sound" of the F30 328i comes artificially from the stereo system?!?

(Quote from: ChrisH)




Many thanks for your response. Why would you prefer a teat? I always thought that turbo cars were more preferred. ....
(Quote from: Delgado7)


It's all a matter of taste.

A turbo has more torque down around. On the other hand, it does not turn up so freely and the performance drops at the top.
The performance starts with a slight delay, then comes the turbo boost. The 4-cylinder turbo also lacks the smooth running of the engine. The engine sound inside is generated (as already discussed) via the loudspeakers, because the real sound in a BMW was not at all convincing (the predecessor had a straight six).

The in-line six-cylinder vacuum cleaner runs like a turbine: completely vibration-free and it revs up happily. The power is immediately available when you accelerate and increases linearly with the speed. It can therefore be ideally dosed. (The automatic will water this down again if necessary). And the sound is really great. On the other hand, it has less torque at low speeds.

The real reason for turbos is, on the one hand, the increasing weight of the vehicles, which would have to be compensated for by increasing the displacement of the vacuum cleaner. On the other hand, it is the completely unfamiliar NEDC consumption cycle: The turbo performs better there. Whether it consumes less in real life is a completely different matter. In addition, the car manufacturer can save a lot of money if he builds only one turbo with four power levels instead of four differently sized vacuum cleaners.

If you want something to drive comfortably, then you may find a turbo quite pleasant because of the torque. On the other hand, the 4-cylinder turbo lacks the silky engine run.
If it should be more sporty, then the poorer power dosage of the turbo is not exactly beneficial. You will especially notice this when it gets slippery, for example when driving in wet conditions. It gets even worse on snow because the sudden onset of the fat torque wave makes sensitive gas metering even more difficult. Instead of a drift, a spin comes out quickly. If you also like to drift on snow, then definitely take the vacuum cleaner (and then preferably with a manual transmission because of the clutch pedal). But since your Benz does not allow this anyway because of the ESP that cannot be switched off there, it may not be an issue for you at all and you are completely satisfied with the turbo. And since you drove turbo diesel before, you may have got used to this turbo characteristic and find the vacuum cleaner to be inelastic. The best thing to do is drive both times and get an idea of ​​what you like better.

BMW drivers were spoiled for decades with the silky straight-six. The switch to small 4-cylinder turbos is a real culture shock. That's why it's a hot topic among BMW drivers.

greetings
ChrisH

Edited by: ChrisH on Jan 24, 2015 at 8:40:15 PM

Edited by: ChrisH on January 24th, 2015 at 8:41:23 PM
"An adequate driver is also useful here - possibly from the Porsche warehouse. A good car fairy could have whispered three words in his ear: What more for?"

Quote from the test of the BMW 323ti, AMS, issue 20/1997


With that much horsepower, it should be able to pull well, but I'm just wondering if this engine has a long service life, not that it will end at 180,000-200,000. I just ask myself whether the 328i is not too overloaded with 2 liters of displacement and so much horsepower.
(Quote from: Delgado7)


You talk like my father did then. This topic, which such a small engine with this power could not last that long, is as old and boring as many other truisms.

40 years ago, when most of them were still rattling around the Christmas tree, an engine rarely lasted up to 200,000 km - a mileage that can now be easily achieved by any small car. The engines have become more and more powerful, more reliable and - to the chagrin of the manufacturers - more and more durable. This applies to petrol and diesel engines.

Different manufacturing techniques and materials are used in today's engines. 40 years ago, more than half of the engines died of a piston jam or bearing damage, but these types of damage rarely occur today with proper maintenance (important!). It is not the performance that makes a Knülle engine, but the driver. That too cannot be emphasized enough.

Basically, customers who have frequent problems with their engine or vehicle can be divided into three groups, regardless of the manufacturer:

Group 1: The non-owners
The classic non-owner only drives the vehicle - usually the classic company car. He rents it, is the lessee or the vehicle comes from the vehicle pool of the company in which he works. Since he doesn't have to bear any maintenance costs, he doesn't give a damn about careful handling of the vehicle. After a few tens of thousands of kilometers, it’s gone anyway and premature defects are the problem for the subsequent owner.

Group 2: I don't have any money
Primarily young and male, after training, you want to finally go pee with the big dogs and buy a cart that looks great, but is as cheap as possible. After a while you notice that a car that looks great is not cheap to maintain either. So you try to help yourself, as much as possible either do it yourself, have a friend do it yourself or in a cheap backyard workshop "We can all cars" and repair more broken than whole. Most of the time, this is not noticed immediately. Just one example: In more than 50% of the cases of a defective head gasket, the head has already been down. In the case of air and oil filters, even the tax authorities notice that they are three times more likely to be found on workshop bills than they are sold by manufacturers and impoteurs. A vehicle that is broken down for cost reasons guarantees a short engine life

Group 3: The I-am-the-specialist specialists
Basically at least two or third owners. I remove the swirl flaps, although I didn't really understand what they're good for, but everyone in the forums says yes ... And those at BMW are too stupid anyway - but it's not me, I chip my 25d a 30d ,, is anyway the same engine, at least it looks the same. Classic saying for questions in a forum "I've already exchanged everything". Also: a BMW can be kicked when it's warm and besides, I know everything better anyway.

The manufacturers owe a big thank you to these three groups, as they secure over 80% of the income from engine and drive-related spare parts. In contrast, the fourth group earns relatively little money:

Group 4: The rest
He makes every inspection according to the factory instructions, the original quality of oil is still used even after 250,000 km. After 200,000km, two glow plugs in his diesel were defective, he immediately had them all done because he couldn't imagine the others looking better. He often unconsciously warms his car carefully, sometimes he likes to drive very fast, but doesn't kick the engine. He doesn't hang around in forums because there is nothing to report except that his car is running as it should. It belongs to the rest, but also to a large number of BMW drivers.

Because of my job and a very high-ranking relationship, my family, relatives and 50% of them drive BMWs with us. In the last 30 years that was a total of around 80-100 vehicles. Only one person got into trouble: Our insurance agent (E39 525d) lost the turbo. When I asked him if something had been done on the car, he said, "Could it be because I had the engine control optimized so that he could do something a little easier with the caravan .." He got no comment, but got an invoice from me. Otherwise no expensive damage, at that time a couple of window lifters, a glass sunroof went wrong with two of them, I got rid of a couple of camshaft sensors, a set of injectors and a zoo of glow plugs - but that's about it.

The service life of an engine is no longer a question of performance in relation to size, but of handling. A small engine warms up faster and therefore runs less when cold. A cousin of mine has been driving his 520d for over 400,000 km and he regrets the saying "I'll drive the car until it falls apart". And the mechanical load of the 20d is higher than that of the 28i.
Your car is only fast enough if you have your pants full before you get in.
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To cut it short, the two views on the subject:

The BMW and engine fan will always recommend the E9x 6 cylinder. A large nipple with multiple cylinders is just a whole different number. Less vibrations, more comfort, smooth revving, beautiful sound. It just has something upscale. Everyone has a jarring 4 cylinder.
In addition, the F30 has lost its sportiness again for the E90.

Those who always need the latest gadgets advise you to go for the F30. The performance is slightly above the suction cups, everything looks better on paper. In reality, however, it has no real advantage. Joystick, sat nav and all that stuff are newer and possibly better. What counts for me in the car is the drive and driving itself, so that iwie cannot attract and convince me.

A charged 4 cylinder will not run as long as a 6 cylinder vacuum under guarantee (you will get one from me).
And if it is "only" the turbo - 300tkm, as is usual with the 6-cylinder, the 4-cylinder turbo will not do without any problems.

The best thing to do is to try both times and take your own picture after yourself. I would definitely recommend the 330i or 335i E9x. (my choice would be 330i 258PS)

But you also have the turbo surcharge with the 335i!
less traction - more action!

EAT / SLEEP / DRIFT
-> My motors never turn into the limiter!


If you can't afford that as an annual car, then you should leave your fingers off.
At the age of 23 you should look even more closely at your upkeep.
(Quote from: joecrashE36)


Hi,

basically correct - but what amounts are we talking about here?
An F30 328i costs from 20 million upwards.
You definitely get an E90 330i for this.

The F30 328i is cheaper to maintain than the E90 330i.
Less consumption, less cubic capacity, less CO2 emissions, insurance classification that is 2 classes lower.
What you save when you buy an E90 can be refueled, taxed and insured for a while.

Whether the E90 is the nicer car - not for me.
I find the E90 (and also Touring, Coupé, Cabrio) to be the least successful 3 Series.
And the F30 is clearly the better car.
The six-cylinder whining threads in the BMW forums do not change that either ...

Ciao - Carsten
Nice cars start with "B" - BMW and Borsche ...


.....

Whether the E90 is the nicer car - not for me.
I find the E90 (and also Touring, Coupé, Cabrio) to be the least successful 3 Series.
And the F30 is clearly the better car.
The six-cylinder whining threads in the BMW forums do not change that either ...

Ciao - Carsten
(Quote from: cxm)


I never liked the bangle design.
On the other hand, is the F30 the better car now? Better in what? Safe in suspension comfort - which was not difficult compared to the E9x. But otherwise? The suspension comfort is bought at a high price:
An excerpt from the test of the F30 335i:
"Worse still: the significantly lighter and somewhat weaker BMW 335i is not faster, but even slower than the Audi S4. The comparatively callous steering, pronounced lateral inclination and the hefty understeer of the BMW 335i are good for 1.17.7 minutes in Baden. "
Now that's not really what I expect from a BWM.
Or as another tester wrote so beautifully:
"A good car, but not a good BMW".

greetings
ChrisH
"An adequate driver is also useful here - possibly from the Porsche warehouse. A good car fairy could have whispered three words in his ear: What more for?"

Quote from the test of the BMW 323ti, AMS, issue 20/1997
Which brings us to the "new is always better" type ....

The E90 is not really the shocker from the Bangle era. But there is no need to argue about taste when it comes to optics. I'm just saying so much about it, but I don't like the new front at all. It looks good with the M, with the standard 3 series it's kind of pretty arbitrary.
What is really the better car, you will see after more than 200tkm. From a driving point of view, I would prefer to be sporty rather than (too) comfortable, which is why you usually look for a BMW.
less traction - more action!

EAT / SLEEP / DRIFT
Nice cars start with "B" - BMW and Borsche ...
Chris Created on January 25th, 2015 at 13:53:43