Why are medical students depressed


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Good Morning,

I would like to study medicine my grades are good enough for that only I came across this text on the internet by chance:

Boston - According to a meta-analysis in the US-American Ärzteblatt (2016; 316: 2214-2236) every fourth medical student suffers from depression, every tenth had even thought about suicide. However, only very few sought treatment

Is that really true? And how did you experience it during your studies? Because I am very concerned about this point.

I can not confirm. Not at all. :-nothing

Depending on the study, the prevalence in the 18-25 age group is up to 25%. So the number mentioned is not particularly unusual. Besides, that doesn't say anything about causality.

I think this is more the case with the "older" students who came in after waiting. Often they are then overwhelmed and notice what it means to have not learned 6-7 years.

I think this is more the case with the "older" students who came in after waiting. Often they are then overwhelmed and notice what it means to have not learned 6-7 years.

Your contributions cheer me up again and again and help me not to realize my suicidal thoughts.
Thanks.

Ps: Have you already got enough protein today?

I think this is more the case with the "older" students who came in after waiting. Often they are then overwhelmed and notice what it means to have not learned 6-7 years.

I really wonder why you haven't been banned yet. Provocative, unnecessary posts with tips for medical students from someone who is not even approved for the same.

To the topic:
Sure, the course is demanding, but can a study dissuade you from it? The question is whether you want to do this yourself or "only" because you can do it based on your grades.

Or just posts that defy naivety.
Read across what a depression "usually" is; Strangely enough, there is nothing in my books about old, overwhelmed waiting students.
We (budding) medical professionals in particular should have a little more sensitivity and instinct when it comes to mental / psychiatric illnesses ...

Good Morning,

I would like to study medicine my grades are good enough for that only I came across this text on the internet by chance:

Boston - According to a meta-analysis in the US-American Ärzteblatt (2016; 316: 2214-2236 (tel: 2214-2236)) every fourth medical student suffers from depression, every tenth had even thought about suicide. However, only very few sought treatment

Is that really true? And how did you experience it during your studies? Because I am very concerned about this point.
You could also just see it this way: three quarters of medical students do not suffer from depression, they just study ...
Why does an American meta-analysis worry you so much that you ask such questions?

If you want to study medicine, then you should. Whether you develop depression does not depend on the course of study, but also on other factors.

By the way, I feel like lava: I can't confirm my studies. Or the few fellow students who have developed mental illnesses (certainly a lot less than 1/4!), Had the predisposition (or even the illness) before the start of the course and did not get it through studying alone.

I would also rather assume that with certain predispositions, depression can manifest itself in the course of the course.

You have to differentiate between a manifest depression in need of treatment and a general dissatisfaction with the overall situation because the course is very demanding, you have not passed exams, you lack money, etc. It is quite normal that you have a bad phase because things are going to shit, and medical students are not spared from it either.

I can't look my fellow students in the head now either, but I can't think of anyone from my university environment who really has manifest problems in the form of a psychiatric illness.

I really wonder why you haven't been banned yet. Provocative, unnecessary posts with tips for medical students from someone who is not even approved for the same.

To the topic:
Sure, the course is demanding, but can a study dissuade you from it? The question is whether you want to do this yourself or "only" because you can do it based on your grades.

That's just a fact of what I wrote. I can't find the table anymore, but it would be proven. People who have a better Abitur NC pass it more often and make it in the standard study time in contrast to people with a bad Abitur. And depression usually arises when you just can't keep up with your studies and are often in search of a third party. And don't forget that in your mid-twenties you can't afford to make any mistakes, otherwise it says hello hartz4

And depression usually arises when you just can't keep up with your studies and are often in search of a third party. And don't forget that in your mid-twenties you can't afford to make any mistakes, otherwise it's hello hartz4
I don't have a place to study medicine either ... but I have to say something about that: This is whisked shit.
Does depression arise when you can no longer keep up with your studies? So only students get depression? Just take a look at some textbook on psychiatry to see what comes about. I haven't read anything about my studies there.
And no longer allow mistakes in your mid-20s? What kind of mistakes do you mean? To get sick?
And of course, when you are in your mid-20s, life is almost over. What has not been settled by then will no longer work, or what?

That's just a fact of what I wrote. I can't find the table anymore, but it would prove that people who have a better Abitur NC pass it more often and make it in the standard study time in contrast to people with a bad Abitur. And depression usually arises when you just can't keep up with your studies and are often in search of a third party. And don't forget that in your mid-twenties you can't afford to make any mistakes, otherwise it says hello hartz4

Since I don't have my table, I can't prove it right now, but on average every second medical student is gifted and budding bodybuilder. Fact!

Now our cute little troll is not still feeding ... I would say, ignoring the troll, it goes back to the question of the TE - otherwise a little castle would have to be attached to it ...

Fire look
MediLearn moderator

I think it's really funny how someone who doesn't even have a university place says he already knows what's going on in his studies. ..incomprehensible. But good on the subject:
There were quite a few with me during the semester who suffered from depression, drug abuse or eating disorders, especially in the pre-hospital stage, but I cannot say whether that was 25%. But I can say for sure that this does not only affect the older students. In my circle of acquaintances, it was rather the opposite, the younger ones were more likely to be affected, but that certainly cannot be said across the board.
The preclinical clinic is stressful and not everyone can cope with the psychological terror that sometimes prevails there. But that doesn't mean that you develop a depression because of it, the predisposition has to be there beforehand.

It's just a time of great changes - living alone for the first time, having to look for new friends, no longer the superstar you always were at school, etc. And then there are the requirements of medical studies, which are of course much more intense than those in high school. It can be a difficult time, especially for perfectionists. Even if I never noticed anything that could have been even remotely called "psychological terror". Bad coping strategies, on the other hand, can be experienced every day, especially in the pre-clinical setting - some fellow students totally messed themselves up there.

You shouldn't assume that you will notice all of your fellow students' psychological problems. I myself have only experienced serious problems with very, very few people. The prevalence, however, is certainly much higher than what you notice during your studies. Still, I am convinced that the majority of all medical students do not have mental health problems, and I am also convinced that mental health problems are common in every other degree program.

So IMHO definitely no reason against studying medicine.

However, many of the medical students I know were also the perfectionists of the year. I have also seen medical students with obvious eating disorders disproportionately often, of course that can only be my personal impression. However, it seems to me that not necessarily only "the cool swine" study medicine, but often those who have abnormal expectations of themselves. A failed exam shakes one's self-image.

Nevertheless, the medical degree IMHO is also a good "therapy". Of those who were completely dogged in the first semester, only very, very few are so cramped today in the 9th semester. Most of them are now much more relaxed with regard to expectations / fear of imperfect results, etc.

The problem is probably much more mundane:
Most of the medical students were just very good at school or belonged to the top group there. Often without having to do an awful lot for it. As a good student you often don't learn any real tolerance for mistakes - you haven't done so many.

In medical studies, however, the standard is shifting. You are no longer in the top group with little effort, but in the middle of the field with a lot more effort. In addition, there is the fact that you just don't pack one or the other note. Then this unbelievable amount of material, stuff that you simply don't understand or can't get into your head.
Of course, this can lead to fear of failure.

Then you also have to come to terms with the new phase of life, sometimes also that nobody cares whether you are good or pass an exam. It doesn't even matter whether you come to a lecture. You have to come to terms with that too.

Depending on personal vulnerability, this can trigger a crisis and the other a depression.

I think this is more the case with the "older" students who came in after waiting.

Since the waiting time quota only makes up 20% of the students, the calculation unfortunately does not work out, so not only ALL older students have to be affected, no, even those who received the place through the ADH quota.

I see it in a similar way to Davo and Wacken: new surroundings, high expectations of yourself, low tolerance for mistakes, the study itself.
But it will be the same in similarly intensive subjects.

@ Jul1999:

Don't worry about such negative thoughts, look forward to your studies. It's the hottest time of your life, damn it. Most of you here will confirm that: -party

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