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DE60310036T2 - Gearless electric drive for a thrust reverser and corresponding drive system - Google Patents

Gearless electric drive for a thrust reverser and corresponding drive system Download PDF

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Publication number
DE60310036T2
DE60310036T2DE60310036TDE60310036TDE60310036T2DE 60310036 T2DE60310036 T2DE 60310036T2DE 60310036 TDE60310036 TDE 60310036TDE 60310036 TDE60310036 TDE 60310036TDE 60310036T T2DE60310036 T22DE 6031
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Prior art keywords
actuator
thrust reverser
latch
expansion screw
operable
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DE60310036T
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DE60310036D1 (de
Inventor
J. Terry Mesa AHRENDT
T. Andrew Scottsdale JOHNSON
A. Todd Chandler LANGSTON
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Honeywell International Inc
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Honeywell International Inc
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Priority to US83854priorityCritical
Priority to US10 / 083,854prioritypatent / US6684623B2 / en
Application filed by Honeywell International IncfiledCriticalHoneywell International Inc
Priority to PCT / US2003 / 005589 priority patent / WO2003072922A1 / en
Publication of DE60310036D1publicationCriticalpatent / DE60310036D1 / de
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Publication of DE60310036T2publicationCriticalpatent / DE60310036T2 / de
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Classifications

    • F — MECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02 - COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02K — JET PROPULSION PLANTS
    • F02K1 / 00 — Plants characterized by the form or arrangement of the jet pipe or nozzle; Jet pipes or nozzles peculiar
    • F02K1 / 54 — Nozzles having means for reversing jet thrust
    • F02K1 / 76 — Control or regulation of thrust reversers
    • F — MECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02 - COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02K — JET PROPULSION PLANTS
    • F02K1 / 00 — Plants characterized by the form or arrangement of the jet pipe or nozzle; Jet pipes or nozzles peculiar
    • F02K1 / 54 — Nozzles having means for reversing jet thrust
    • F02K1 / 76 — Control or regulation of thrust reversers
    • F02K1 / 763 — Control or regulation of thrust reversers with actuating systems or actuating devices; Arrangement of actuators for thrust reversers
    • Y — GENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02 — TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02T — CLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES RELATED TO TRANSPORTATION
    • Y02T50 / 00 — Aeronautics or air transport
    • Y02T50 / 60 — Efficient propulsion technologies, e.g. for aircraft

Description

  • The present invention relates to a thrust reverser actuator and, more particularly, to an electric thrust reverser actuator without a gearbox and a thrust reverser actuator system including the actuator.
  • When landing jet-propelled aircraft, the landing gear brakes and applied aerodynamic tensile loads (e.g. flaps, spoilers, etc.) of the aircraft may not be sufficient to brake the aircraft in the required section of the runway length. Therefore, the jet engines of most aircraft contain thrust reversers to increase the aircraft's stopping power. When deployed, the thrust reversers redirect the rearward thrust of the jet engine in a forward direction to slow the aircraft. Since the jet thrust is directed forwards, the jet thrust also brakes the aircraft on landing.
  • In general, various thrust reverser models are known and the particular model used depends, at least in part, on the engine manufacturer, the engine configuration and the drive technology used. The thrust reverser models used primarily in turbofan jet engines fall into three general categories: (1) cascade type thrust reversers, (2) target type thrust reversers, and (3) swing door thrust reversers. Each of these models use a different type of movable thrust reverser component to change the direction of nozzle thrust.
  • Cascade type thrust reversers are typically used on jet engines with a high bypass ratio. This type of thrust reverser is located around the circumference of the central portion of the engine and, when extended, directs and thereby diverts the airflow through a plurality of cascade blades. The movable components of the thrust reverser in the cascade model contain various translational sleeves or caps ("transcowls") that extend to expose the cascade blades.
  • Target type inverters, also known as clam inverters, are typically used in jet engines with a low bypass ratio. The target type thrust reversers use two doors as the movable thrust reverser components to block all nozzle thrust coming from the rear of the engine. These doors are mounted on the rear part of the engine and can form the rear part of the engine nacelle.
  • Swing door thrust reversers can use four doors on the engine nacelle as the movable thrust reverser components. In the extended position, these doors extend outward from the nacelle to divert the nozzle thrust.
  • As mentioned above, thrust reversers are mainly used to increase the stopping force of the aircraft and thereby reduce the stopping distance during landing. Thus, thrust reversers are deployed primarily during the landing process to slow the aircraft down. When the thrust reversers are no longer needed, they return to their original or folded position.
  • The movement of the moveable thrust reverser components in each of the models described above has historically been done by hydraulic or pneumatic actuation systems. Hydraulic systems may include hydraulic controls or lines connected to the aircraft's hydraulic system, hydraulic actuators connected to the moving components, and electrically or hydraulically controlled locking mechanisms. Pneumatic systems include one or more controls that are coupled to one or more pneumatic motors that are coupled to the moving components of the thrust reverser through actuators.
  • More recently, however, the actuation of thrust reversers has been controlled by electrical (or electromechanical) systems. These systems contain one or more electronic control units that control the operation of one or more electric motors. The electric motors are coupled to one or more thrust reverser actuators via reduction gears, which enable the motors to operate more efficiently at high speeds. In some cases, the motors can be coupled via compound lead screws without interposed reduction gears.
  • While the size and weight of today's electric thrust reverser actuation systems are suitable for large commercial jet aircraft applications, they may not adapt well to smaller jet aircraft applications such as business jet aircraft. The reduction gears between the electric motors and actuators can, for example, have an increased system size and weight compared to conventional small nozzle systems. This is partly because the actuation and sensing components associated with the system are individual, non-built-in devices that are of a certain weight and size. A smaller electrical actuation system can therefore be heavier and larger than a conventional non-electrical actuation system. Such a conventional electrical actuation system can therefore be impractical and inefficient because of its size and weight.
  • There is therefore a need for an electric thrust reverser system that can be resized for small aircraft applications, that includes lightweight and compact electric actuators, and that can incorporate the actuation and sensing components in a single actuator assembly. The present invention addresses one or more of these needs.
  • Accordingly, the invention provides a system for controlling movement of a thrust reverser assembly for a jet engine, the system comprising:
    a controller coupled to receive command signals and operable in response to selectively supplying actuator control signals; and
    at least two actuators each operable to move the thrust reverser between a folded position and an extended position, each actuator including:
    an electric motor having an output shaft, the electric motor being electrically coupled to receive the actuator control signals from the controller and to rotate the output shaft in a folding direction and an extending direction in response thereto,
    a rotatably mounted jack screw having a first end and a second end, the first end being coupled to the output shaft of the electric motor to be rotated thereby in the folding direction and the extending direction, and
    a roller nut assembly mounted on the jack screw, the roller nut further comprising a connector configured to couple to the thrust reverser assembly;
    wherein during use of the system the rotation of the expansion screw in the folding direction causes the translation of its associated roller nut assembly towards the second end of the expansion screw and the thrust reverser into the folded position, and wherein the rotation of the expansion screw in the extension direction translates its associated ball nut in Direction on the first end of the expansion screw and the thrust reverser in the direction of the extended position,
    the system being characterized in that at each actuator the first end of the screw jack is coupled to the output shaft without an intermediate gear.
  • From US Pat. No. 5,960,626 an electronic control system for a reverser for a turbo jet engine is known which includes an electromechanical drive device and a locking device which are controlled by means of an electronic control circuit.
  • The present invention provides an electronic thrust reverser actuation system that includes electrical actuators that can be lightweight and / or compact. The actuators can include the actuation and sensing components in a single actuation assembly. The actuators can therefore be used in relatively small jet aircraft applications.
  • Other independent features and advantages of the preferred actuation system will become apparent from the following detailed description, when read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, illustrating by way of example the principles of the invention.
  • Figure 13 is a side view of a jet engine, with a portion of its housing removed, which can utilize the gearless reverse retractor of the present invention;
  • Figure 2 is a simplified, cut-away perspective view of the outlet portion of a jet engine taken along line 2-2 of Figure 2 showing an exemplary embodiment of the gearless electrical actuators of the present invention and the target-type thrust reverser in its extended position;
  • Fig. 3 is a perspective view of an exemplary gearless electrical actuator in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 10 is an exploded perspective view of the exemplary gearless electrical actuator shown in FIG.
  • Figure 13 is an end view of the exemplary gearless electrical actuator shown in Figure 14 with an end portion of the housing removed, the thrust reversers folded and the actuator in a locked position;
  • FIG. 14 is an end view of the exemplary gearless electrical actuator shown in FIG. 10 with an end portion of the housing removed, the thrust reversers extended and the actuator in an unlocked position; and
  • Figure 6 is a simplified schematic illustration of the operation of an exemplary thrust reverser control system in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention.
  • Before proceeding with a detailed description of the apparatus embodying the invention, it should be understood that the embodiment described is not limited to use with any particular type of thrust reverser model. Thus, although the described embodiment is shown and described as being implemented with a target-type thrust reverser in which two hinged doors are used as the movable thrust reverser components for ease of explanation, it can be used with any other type of thrust reverser model.
  • Referring now to Figure 8, there is shown a simplified side view of a jet engine assembly. Such an engine is known as a gas turbine engine. The engine assembly includes an engine nacelle that houses a jet engine. It will be clear to a person skilled in the art that, for the sake of simplicity, in FIG. 1 not the entire jet engine is shown, but only the section of the engine which protrudes from the engine nacelle. This illustrated section is the jet engine outlet, near which the thrust reverser and actuators are mounted.
  • Referring now to Figure 2, which provides a cut away perspective view of the jet engine with the thrust reverser extended, taken along line 2-2 of Figure 8, the actuators of the present invention will now be discussed. As shown, the jet engine exhaust section includes two rearwardly extending arms (only one of which has been shown). Two deflector doors act as the thrust reverser of the jet engine and are pivotably mounted on each of the arms. When the thrust reverser is in the folded position, as shown in FIG. 4, the doors are substantially flush with and form part of the outlet portion of the jet engine. When the thrust reverser is deployed, as shown in FIG. 4, the doors pivot outward and divert the jet engine outlet. Thus, the jet engine outlet is directed forward to create reverse thrust that slows the aircraft down as it lands.
  • A gearless electrical actuator is mounted on each of the extension arms. Each of the actuators, which are explained in more detail below, is coupled to the two doors via two connections. One end of each of the links is pivotally attached to an interior portion of each of the doors and the other end of each link is connected to one of the actuators. This connection and the mode of operation of the actuators will become more apparent from the following description of an exemplary embodiment of the actuators.
  • Referring now to FIGS. 4 and 5, the actuator will be described in detail. In the embodiment shown, the actuator contains a housing which is used to couple the actuator to the outlet section of the jet engine. The housing includes a first side panel, a top panel, a bottom panel, a first end panel, a second end panel, and a second side panel (see Figure 8). The first side plate contains mounting strips that are used to mount the actuator on the extension arms. It will be understood that the actuator could be installed in the jet engine without being encompassed by the housing. It should be noted that the second side panel of the housing is not shown in Figure 12 so that each of the various components that make up the actuator and that are mounted in the housing are more clearly shown in their installed configurations. Each of these various components will now be described in more detail.
  • In the actuators, an electric motor is mounted to the housing near the first end plate and includes an output shaft (shown in FIG. 4). The electric motor can be any of several known models of alternating current (AC) or direct current (DC) motors. In a preferred embodiment, however, the motor is a brushed DC motor. An electromagnetic brake assembly is also mounted near the first end plate of the housing and is coupled to the electric motor. The electromagnetic brake assembly may be any of the numerous models of electromagnetic brake known in the art that preferentially applies braking force to the motor when the brake assembly is de-energized and which removes the braking force when it is energized. A speed sensor may additionally be coupled to any of the rotating elements of the actuator including, but not limited to, the motor, electromagnetic brake assembly, and expansion screw (described below). The speed sensor is used to detect the speed and to provide a speed control feedback signal. In particular, as is well known, various speed control schemes can be used to control the speed of a motor. Some control schemes use feedback from a speed sensor, while others (called sensorless speed control schemes) do not require feedback from a speed sensor. Both types of control schemes are known in the art and therefore do not need to be described further. However, if the actuator and thus the motor are controlled with the aid of a control scheme with feedback from a speed sensor, the speed sensor is preferably included. However, if the engine is being controlled using a sensorless speed control scheme, the speed sensor need not be included. The speed sensor can be any of a variety of speed sensors known in the art, including, but not limited to, tachometers and optical sensors.
  • The output shaft of the electric motor is coupled to an expansion screw without an intermediate gear. As in the embodiment shown, the output shaft can additionally be coupled to the expansion screw via a flexible coupling. Alternatively, the output shaft of the electric motor can be coupled to the expansion screw via a ribbed coupling. In a preferred embodiment, however, the output shaft of the electric motor is coupled directly to the expansion screw. In any case, the expansion screw is rotated directly by the output shaft of the motor without the aid of any intermediate gear. The expansion screw is rotatably mounted by means of a pair of bearing assemblies, a first bearing assembly and a second bearing assembly mounted in the housing at opposite ends of the expansion screw. The expansion screw is made with a thread with a relatively fine thread pitch. In one embodiment, the expansion screw is, for example, a roller screw that is manufactured with a thread pitch of approximately 0.078 inches (2.0 millimeters). As is well known, roller screws are a certain category of expansion screws that are manufactured with such a fine thread pitch. A non-limiting example of such a roller screw that can be used in the present invention is manufactured by Ina Bearing under part number RGTFS 20.2.258. It is also clear that the motor size and power can be reduced as the pitch of the thread of the expansion screw becomes smaller. The specific thread pitch and motor size are selected to provide the correct performance of the system and to fit within the desired size range of the actuator.
  • A roller nut assembly is attached to the jack screw between the first and second bearing assemblies. As shown in more detail in FIG. 14, the roller nut assembly includes a roller nut surrounded by a housing assembly which, in the illustrated embodiment, includes an adapter housing and an end wall. The adapter housing contains two connectors, which enable the roller nut assembly to be coupled to the doors of the thrust reverser. In the embodiment shown in FIG. 12, one connection connection extends through a first translation slot in the top plate and the other connection connection extends through a second translation slot in the bottom plate. The thrust reverser connections are each connected to the connection connections. The translation of the roller nut assembly from near the second bearing assembly to near the first bearing assembly thus causes the thrust reverser connections to move the doors to the extended position, and the reverse translation of the roller nut assembly from near the first bearing assembly to near the second bearing assembly causes the thrust reverser connections to move Move the doors to the folded position. It will be understood that while the roller nut assembly is shown in Figure 9 as being comprised of separate parts, it may be comprised of a single, integral unit. It is further understood that the roller nut assembly can include more or less than the two terminal connection sections.
  • A plurality of position sensors are mounted in the housing to provide signals representative of the thrust reverser position. In particular, a first proximity sensor and a second proximity sensor are used to provide thrust reverser position signals. The first and second proximity sensors are preferably eddy current kill oscillator (ECKO) type sensors, although other types of sensors known in the art including, but not limited to, Hall effect sensors, optical sensors, resistance sensors, RVDTs and LVDTs, depending on the particular application, could be used either alone or in combination.
  • A first actuator target and a second actuator target are each mounted on both sides of the roller nut. The first actuator target mark and the second actuator target mark are configured and each consist of a material suitable for the specific sensor technology. When the first actuator target is near the first proximity sensor, the first proximity sensor provides an electrical output signal indicating that the roller nut, and hence the thrust reverser, has reached a fully extended position. Similarly, the second proximity sensor supplies an electrical output signal indicating that the roller nut and thus the thrust reverser have reached the folded position when the second actuator target is close to the second proximity sensor. It should be pointed out that although the first and second target mark arrangements are shown as containing adjusting bolts, the target mark arrangements, in a preferred embodiment, are not adjustable, but are fixedly attached to the roller nut.
  • The gearless electrical actuator further includes a thrust reverser door proximity sensor, a plurality of latches, and a latch magnet each mounted near the second end plate of the housing. The sensor for the thrust reverser door is, similarly to the first and second proximity sensors, preferably an ECKO-type sensor. A target (not shown), similar to the first and second actuator target, is thus mounted on at least one of the thrust reverser doors. The function of the thrust reverser door sensor is to provide an electrical indicator that indicates whether the thrust reverser doors are folded or not. More specifically, the thrust reverser door sensor provides an electrical output signal indicating that the thrust reverser is in the folded position when the thrust reverser door with the target attached is moved near the thrust reverser door sensor.
  • A second connector is mounted on the second end plate. The connector provides the electrical interface between the actuator and any external control equipment (discussed below). Electrical lines (not shown in Figures 13 and 13) to and from all electrical components in the actuator are coupled to the connector.
  • The structure and function of the latches will now be described with reference to and in conjunction with FIGS. When the thrust reverser doors are in the folded position, the latches are moved to a locked position (see) to move the thrust reverser doors to the folded position. In contrast, the latches are moved to an unlocked position (see) when the reverser doors are to be moved to the extended position to allow movement of the reverser doors.
  • The latches are pivotally mounted in the housing and are normally biased to the unlocked position by a biasing member such as the spring shown, and are held in the locked position by the latch magnet. In particular, the locking magnet contains a movable web which extends from one of its ends. When the latch magnet is excited, the movable bar is moved away from the latch. As a result, the biasing element causes the bolts to pivot into the unlocked position, thereby releasing the thrust reverser doors. When the thrust reverser doors are moved to the folded position, the doors move the latches to the locked position against the biasing force of the biasing member. When the bolts reach the locked position, the bolt magnet is discharged. Since the movable bar is biased to the extended position by a spring (not shown), when the latch magnet is discharged, the movable bar extends to the latches and holds the latches in the locked position. A seam sensor is mounted in the housing and provides an electrical signal indicating when the bars have reached the locked position. The bartack proximity sensor is preferably of the same type as those of the first and second proximity sensors and the proximity sensor for the thrust reverser door.
  • The gearless electrical actuators operate under the control of a thrust reverser control system. A simplified schematic representation of the operation of an exemplary thrust reverser control system is shown in FIG. 12 and will now be described in greater detail. The control system preferably includes a multi-channel engine control unit, although it will be appreciated that multiple engine control units with single channels could be used. In any case, the engine control unit is coupled to a multi-channel engine control and to at least two actuators. The engine control unit receives commands from the engine control and provides control signals to each actuator in response. These control signals contain signals to energize the motor and the electromagnetic brake assembly so that the electromagnetic brake assembly is caused to remove its braking force on the motor and that the motor moves in one of two directions, the extension and the folding directions. The first and second proximity sensors provide signals representative of the thrust reverser position to both the engine control unit and the engine control unit.
  • Even if the control system described here is based on an embodiment in which the actuation control signals are supplied via the engine control, it will be clear to the person skilled in the art that the actuation control signals could also come directly from the aircraft control.
  • As mentioned above, the bolts of the thrust reverser are held in the locked position by the movable web of the locking magnet and are normally biased into the unlocked position by the biasing element. The drive mechanism control also supplies control signals in order to stimulate the bolt magnets in a targeted manner when the bolts are to be moved into the unlocked position. In response, the moveable bars translate from their extended position to their retracted position, allowing the latches to move through the biasing elements to the unlocked position. The bartack proximity sensors each feed a signal to the motor control unit which indicates when the bartacks are in the locked and the unlocked position. Similarly, the proximity sensors for the thrust reverser doors each supply a signal to the engine control unit that indicates when the thrust reverser doors have reached the folded position.
  • Having described the actuators and the control system structurally, a description of the operation of the actuators and the control system will now be provided. In doing so, reference should be made to to together. In addition, this operational description is directed to the thrust reverser, which is initially in the folded position, then is moved to the extended position and back to the folded position.
  • To extend the thrust reverser doors from the folded position, the pilot enters an extension command into the engine control. The engine control in turn sends command signals to the engine control and also excites the locking magnets. Upon receipt of the command from the engine controller, the engine controller energizes the engine and the electromagnetic braking assemblies, thereby removing the braking force on the motors. In one embodiment, the engine control first causes the engines to rotate in the folding direction. This initial rotation of the motors and jack bolts, and thus the translation of the roller nuts in the hinge direction, causes the thrust reverser doors to move in the hinge direction in a movement called the "flip over" movement against the latches. This flipping movement of the doors against the bolt rotates the bolt out of contact with the rotating bar of the bolt magnet.
  • When the engine control causes the latch magnets to be excited, the movable latches are moved to their retracted position. This causes the biasing elements to move their respective latches to the unlocked position, thereby releasing the thrust reverser doors. The rotation of the bolt into the unlocked position is detected by the bartack proximity sensors, which feed the corresponding signals to the engine control unit and the engine control unit.
  • When the engine control unit receives the signal from the bartack sensors indicating that the thrust reverser doors are no longer locked, it then outputs signals that stimulate the motors to rotate in the extend direction. This causes the expansion screws to rotate causing the associated roller nut assemblies to translate to the extended position which move the thrust reverser doors to the extended position.
  • When the roller nut assemblies move translationally from the folded position to the extended position, the first and second proximity sensors, each associated with an actuator, supply appropriate position signals to both the engine control and the engine control unit. In addition, the proximity sensors for the thrust reverser doors each send a signal to the engine control unit, which indicates that the thrust reverser doors are no longer in the folded position. When the first proximity sensors on each actuator indicate that the roller nut assemblies, and thus the thrust reverser doors, are nearly in the fully extended position, the engine control unit initiates the stop sequence. This stopping sequence includes shorting the motors, which provides electromagnetic braking, and turning off power to the electromagnetic braking assemblies, causing them to apply braking forces to the motors, both of which help stop the motors from rotating.
  • When the thrust reverser doors no longer have to be folded in, the pilot inputs a corresponding signal into the engine control system. The engine controller, in turn, provides command signals to the engine controller that energize the motors and electromagnetic braking assemblies, thereby removing the braking force from the motors and causing the motors to move into the folding mechanism. This causes the expansion screws to rotate, causing the translational movement of the associated roller nut assemblies in the folded-in direction, which cause the thrust reverser doors to move into the folded-in position.
  • During the translational movement of the roller nut assemblies from the extended to the folded position, the first and second proximity sensors, which are each assigned to an actuator, supply corresponding position signals to both the engine control and the engine control unit. When the thrust reverser doors approach into the folded position, the proximity sensors for the thrust reverser doors each send a signal to the engine control unit, which indicates that the thrust reverser doors are in the folded position. In addition, the thrust reverser doors contact the latches, causing the latches to rotate to the locked position. When the latch proximity sensors on each actuator indicate that the latches are in the locked position, the motor control unit causes the latch magnets to be discharged and the motors and electromagnetic brake assemblies to be discharged by the motor control unit.As a result, the movable webs translate to their extended position, thereby holding the latches in the locked position, and the electromagnetic brake assemblies apply braking force to the motors, thereby stopping the motors from rotating.
  • It should be noted that in a preferred embodiment in which the engine controller implements a control system with feedback from a speed sensor, the speed sensors in each actuator also feed feedback signals about the engine speed to the engine controller. Alternatively, if the engine controller implements a sensorless speed control system, the feedback signals from the speed sensors are not used.
  • Since the expansion screw has a thread with a relatively fine pitch, the electrical actuators and the actuation system described immediately above do not require any gears connected between the motor and the expansion screw, which makes them relatively lightweight and compact. The actuator can also contain all of the actuation and sensing components in a single actuation assembly. The actuator is particularly useful in relatively small jet aircraft applications, but can be used in aircraft of various sizes, large and small.

Claims (12)

  1. A system for controlling movement of a thrust reverser assembly for a jet engine, the system comprising: a controller (14) coupled to receive command signals and operable in response to selectively supplying actuator control signals; and at least two actuators (16) each operable to move the thrust reverser between a folded position and an extended position, each actuator comprising an electric motor (14) having an output shaft (14), the electric motor being electrically coupled to the To receive actuator control signals from the controller (14) and to rotate the output shaft (14) in response to a folding direction and an extension direction, a rotatably mounted jack screw (14) having a first end and a second end, the first end being connected to the output shaft (14) of the Electric motor is coupled to be rotated thereby in the folding direction and the extension direction, and a roller nut assembly (14) mounted on the jack screw (14), the roller nut (14) further comprising a connector (14) configured to couple to the thrust reverser assembly while using the system, turning the expansion screw () in the folding direction causes the translation of its associated roller nut assembly () towards the second end of the expansion screw and the thrust reverser towards the folded position, and the rotation of the expansion screw () in the extension direction translates its associated ball nut () towards the first end of the expansion screw and the thrust reverser towards the extended position causes the system characterized is that in each actuator () the first end of the expansion screw () is coupled to the output shaft () without an intermediate gear.
  2. The system of claim 1, wherein the controller (14) is further operative to selectively supply brake signals and wherein each actuator further comprises: an electromagnetic brake assembly (14) coupled to the electric motor and electrically coupled to receive the brake signals and operative is to selectively stop the electric motor (14) in response.
  3. The system of claim 1, wherein each of the actuators further comprises: at least one thrust reverser position sensor (12, 14) operable to provide position signals representative of a position of the thrust reverser.
  4. The system of claim 3, wherein the thrust reverser position sensor comprises a first position sensor (14) and a second position sensor (14), the first position sensor (14) being coupled to the actuator near the first end of the jack screw and the second position sensor (14) being coupled to the actuator is coupled in the vicinity of the second end of the expansion screw.
  5. The system of claim 1, wherein the jack screw (14) is a roller screw having a thread pitch of about 2.0 millimeters (0.078 inches).
  6. The system of claim 1, wherein each actuator further comprises: a fold position switch (14) operable to provide a thrust reverser fold signal when the thrust reverser is in the folded position.
  7. The system of claim 1, wherein each actuator further comprises: at least one thrust reverser latch (14) operable to selectively move between locked and unlocked positions.
  8. The system of claim 7, wherein each latch is pivotally mounted near one end of the actuator, and wherein the actuator further comprises: a biasing member (14) mounted near one of the at least one latch (14) and a portion in adjacent contact with has the bolt so as to bias the bolt into the unlocked position.
  9. The system of claim 8, wherein the controller (14) is further operative to supply latch control signals, and wherein each actuator further comprises: a latch magnet (14) having a movable web (14), the latch magnet being coupled to receive the latch control signals and operative to selectively move the web (14) in response thereto so that the latch (14) is engaged and disengaged.
  10. The system of claim 8, wherein each actuator further comprises: a latch position indicator (12) coupled to the actuator near the at least one latch (14) and operable to provide latch position signals representative of the locked and unlocked positions.
  11. The system of claim 1, wherein the jack screw (14) is rotatably mounted by at least two bearing assemblies (12, 14).
  12. The system of claim 1, wherein each actuator further comprises: a speed sensor (14) coupled to the electric motor (14) and operable to generate a feedback signal representative of the number of revolutions of the electric motor, the controller (14) being coupled to to receive the feedback signal from the speed sensor (14) and to condition the actuator control signals to control the number of revolutions of the electric motor.
DE60310036T2002-02-272003-02-25 Gearless electric drive for a thrust reverser and corresponding drive system ActiveDE60310036T2 (de)

Priority Applications (3)

Application NumberPriority DateFiling dateTitle
US838542002-02-27
US10 / 083,854US6684623B2 (en) 2002-02-272002-02-27Gearless electric thrust reverser actuators and actuation system incorporating same
PCT / US2003 / 005589WO2003072922A1 (en) 2002-02-272003-02-25Electric thrust reverser actuation system

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DE60310036TActiveDE60310036T2 (de) 2002-02-272003-02-25Gearless electric drive for a thrust reverser and corresponding drive system

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