What are some examples of recessive traits

Heredity (genetics)

In this article, we will deal with inheritance from the perspective of biology. We will explain to you what is meant by inheritance and give some examples of inheritance. This article belongs to our field of biology or genetics.

Inheritance is the transmission of genetic information from living beings to their offspring. The transfer of skills and knowledge through teaching and learning is to be distinguished from this and is not referred to as inheritance. In the area of ​​inheritance, a distinction is made between different types of inheritance, which will now be presented.

Let's start briefly with an important term that we will need shortly: allele. An allele describes a possible expression of a gene that is located at a certain location on a chromosome. In the case of dominant-recessive inheritance, one allele prevails over another allele in the expression of a characteristic. The prevailing allele is referred to as dominant, the other as recessive.

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Inheritance: dominant recessive inheritance

In the case of dominant-recessive inheritance, one allele prevails over another allele in the expression of a characteristic. The prevailing allele is referred to as dominant, the other as recessive. Example: The eye color in humans is inherited as dominant-recessive, whereby the allele for brown eyes is dominant and the allele for blue eyes is recessive. If a child receives the genetic information for blue eyes from one parent and the genetic information for brown eyes from the other, the child will have brown eyes. However, the genetic information for the recessive allele (here "blue eyes") is retained. It can be passed on to the next generation.
In a diploid organism, the splits described in Mendel's rules can be observed. In the case of dominant-recessive inheritance, the offspring often completely resemble one parent, as only the dominant gene prevails - the characteristics of the recessive gene are indeed present in the genome, but are not expressed in this generation.

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Inheritance: Intermediate inheritance

In the case of inheritance, it can happen that one allele prevails over another allele - i.e. is dominant. In some genes, however, no allele suppresses the other. For example, if you cross wonder flowers with red and white flowers, the next generation will have pink flowers. This creates a mixture of colors.

Inheritance: Dihybrid inheritance

In the case of a dihybrid inheritance, however, one is interested in the inheritance of two traits. Example: Gregor Mendel carried out crossings with pea plants that differed in two characteristics (color and seeds). One of the peas had yellow and wrinkled seeds, the other green and round seeds. In the following generation only yellow round seeds appeared. So yellow was dominant over green and round over angular.

Inheritance: monohybrid inheritance

With a monohybrid inheritance, however, one is only interested in one single trait and how this is passed on to the offspring. Example: If one examines only the flower color in inheritance and how this is transferred to an offspring, one speaks of a monohybrid inheritance. This is what happened with Gregor Mendel's investigation and the associated list of Mendel's rules.

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