Who invented the internet first?

Who invented the internet?

Who invented the internet?

The idea came from the computer scientist Paul Baran, the physicist Donald Watts Davies and other scientists around 50 years ago. On a secret mission by the American military. Back then, war was looming and the American military was looking for an indestructible technique for exchanging classified messages. During this time, all messages went through central offices. These were easy targets for enemies to attack. If they failed, almost nothing worked. The trick of the inventors: They connected computers in four cities that were far apart from each other without a control center via several lines. If a part of the system failed, there were still many other ways to get there. That was the predecessor of today's internet. It was called Arpanet and was inaugurated in America in 1969.


However, this first network could by no means be compared with today's technology. The computers were the size of a refrigerator and quickly overloaded. At the dress rehearsal in 1969, Baran and Davies exchanged only three letters on their computers: LOG for login. It should not have come to the G: Allegedly, the computers ran hot and crashed. A little later, however, everything worked much better.


Still, the idea hit like lightning. The University of London was the first foreign institution to join the American network. Many more computers, small networks and services were quickly added. There was also email. But at that time nobody knew anything about the most famous service on the Internet. The World Wide Web had yet to be invented.