Can modern science reject metaphysics?

Karl Poppers Rehabilitation of Metaphysics and the Metaphysical Research Programs

Handbook Karl Popper pp 1-13 | Cite as

  • Volker Gadenne
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Part of the Springer Reference Humanities book series (SPREFGEIST)

Summary

Even in the early phase of his thinking, Popper distanced himself from the logical-positivistic rejection of metaphysics as meaningless. Nonetheless, he used the criterion of falsifiability to distinguish empirical science and metaphysics from one another. He later came to believe that metaphysical theories, although not falsifiable, are nevertheless rationally debatable, and he argued e.g. B. for metaphysical realism. He also referred to the important role that metaphysical research programs play in science. He contributed to the discussion of such programs, and he developed metaphysical theories himself (e.g. the three worlds doctrine).

keywords

Delimitation criterion Falsifiability Metaphysics Metaphysical realism Verification principle
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literature

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1. Johannes Kepler University LinzLinzAustria