EMT classes require high-level math

Why study math?

Job and Career Planner Mathematics pp 25-99 | Cite as

  • Gunter Dueck
  • Eberhard Zeidler
  • Günter M. Ziegler
  • Regine Kramer
  • Martin Grötschel
  • Ulrich Hirsch
  • Claudia Klüppelberg
  • Christian Kredler
  • Helmut Neunzert
  • Angela Stevens
  • Petra Mutzel
  • Angela Kunoth
  • Dierk Schleicher
  • Günter Törner

abstract

You can now hear and read it everywhere: Mathematics permeates all areas of life and acts as a motor and catalyst for innovations in science and business. Nevertheless, one can ask the question: Why study mathematics? Isn't it enough to have limited, purely application-related, mathematical methodological knowledge? The following contributions are on the one hand passionate advocates for mathematics and mathematics studies and on the other hand impressive demonstrations of the omnipresence of mathematics. Your authors and interviewees: mathematicians with heart and soul, as well as a journalist. The labors and joys of learning mathematical thinking are the subject of the first post. The second text deals with mathematics as the “organ of knowledge” and its broad spectrum of effects, and the following text deals with the beauty, elegance and significance of mathematical proofs.

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literature

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Copyright information

© Vieweg + Teubner | GWV Fachverlage GmbH, Wiesbaden 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gunter Dueck
  • Eberhard Zeidler
  • Günter M. Ziegler
  • Regine Kramer
  • Martin Grötschel
  • Ulrich Hirsch
  • Claudia Klüppelberg
  • Christian Kredler
  • Helmut Neunzert
  • Angela Stevens
  • Petra Mutzel
  • Angela Kunoth
  • Dierk Schleicher
  • Günter Törner

There are no affiliations available