What are the low investment entrepreneurship projects

What is an entrepreneur? Definition & role models

1. When is an entrepreneur an entrepreneur?

In the classic sense, or derived from French ("entre" and "prendre", ie "to undertake"), means entrepreneur Entrepreneur. So what is meant is the owner of a company who bears the greatest responsibility and the most risks. However, the term entrepreneur in today's context goes far beyond the actual function as owner or managing director. For example, an entrepreneur is characterized by:

  • Ideas that are ahead of their time
  • a disruptive personality
  • a great feeling for innovation

An entrepreneur is usually very goal-oriented, committed and does not shy away from uncertainty or risks. Striving for improvement is also a core quality of an entrepreneur - even in the event of setbacks and defeats.

A good example of this is the entrepreneur Henry Heinz, who first went bankrupt in 1869 with the sale of horseradish before he was able to build a small empire with the still famous ketchup. He didn't let himself be demotivated by his defeat, but gritted his teeth and devoted himself to his next project.

2. Do I have the founder gene?

With our online solution Unternehmerheld you can find out in 30 questions about personality, planning skills and business ideas whether you have what it takes to be an entrepreneur.

Following the test, you will receive your personal result, which you can use to identify your strengths and weaknesses as a self-employed person after this initial assessment.

To the start-up test

3. Tips to Become an Entrepreneur

You don't become an entrepreneur overnight. However, the right mindset helps immensely and becomes unbeatable in combination with entrepreneurial action. But entrepreneurship can also be achieved without a founder gene:

  • A healthy dose of self-confidence is a must.
    It is important that you believe in your idea and that you do not let setbacks get you down.
  • Dare to plunge into the unknown!
    This is the only way you can discover new ways for yourself and your idea. But be careful: plunging into self-employment without a plan is not the solution. Risks should always be carefully analyzed, for example with a business plan.
  • Let yourself be inspired.
    Check out entrepreneur success stories or read a good book. (to our book tips for future entrepreneurs)
  • Write down your vision and stay tuned.
    You can only see results when you focus on an idea and follow through with it. Large companies don't grow overnight, so give your business the time it needs to grow.
  • Define milestones and goals for your business.
    What does success mean to you? And not just from a financial point of view! What do you want to achieve with your company?
  • Just start.

4. Get started with the business model

Have you done our start-up test and have come to the conclusion that you want to start your great business idea right away? Start small: with planning your business model. Because in order for your idea to become a successful business, it must first become a business model. All you need to plan the business model is a few sticky notes and a very large sheet of paper - or the entrepreneurial hero Business Model Canvas Tool!

You can read about how the Business Model Canvas works in detail and how your idea becomes a well-rounded business model elsewhere - or you can simply try the free tool.

To the Canvas business model

5. Link tips for budding entrepreneurs

6. Entrepreneurs Everyone Knows

  1. Steve Jobs: Steve Jobs is often the prime example of an entrepreneur in today's age: After he failed with the computer "Lisa" in 1983, hardly anyone would have believed that one day he would occupy the high-end segment for smartphones and computers with Apple products.
  2. Arianna Huffington: Arianna Huffington is the founder of the online newspaper Huffington Post, which became the first commercial online newspaper to receive a Pulitzer Prize in 2012. The Times later voted her one of the 100 Most Influential People in the World. Very few people know that one of their books has been rejected by 36 publishers. Only the 37th publisher accepted her book - that clearly proves Huffington's perseverance.
  3. Jeff Bezos: The founder of Amazon was already working on a solar-powered stove and a hovercraft at a young age - so he already had the founding gene when he was still in his infancy. Today the entrepreneur is multi-billionaire.
  4. Oprah Winfrey: The world-famous American began her career as a news presenter before getting her own talk show - which ended up running for nearly 20 years. At the same time, she acted and started a book club. After she finished her talk show, she started her own pay TV channel.
  5. Frank Thelen: The investor, known to a wide audience through the lion's den, is as familiar with setting up a company as it is with failure. But even two bankruptcy proceedings did not stop him from sticking to his ideas. With e42 he finances and supports technology-oriented young entrepreneurs in the early phase.
  6. Elon Musk: The entrepreneur is co-founder of PayPal, but is now best known for Tesla, where he invested in 2004 and is now CEO.
  7. Bill Gates: Even if money is not everything: Bill Gates, as the richest person in the world, can undoubtedly be described as an entrepreneur. In addition to founding Microsoft, he founded the company bgC3 in 2008 and is involved in other start-ups - including ResearchGate from Berlin.

7. ... and entrepreneurs who are less well known

  1. Kevin Systrom & Mike Krieger: In 2010, the founders of Instagram did not expect their app to take over Facebook and become the starting point for influencer marketing.
  2. Marie Kondo: "Spark joy?" - The Japanese made her worldwide breakthrough in 2012 with her clean-up book "Magic Cleaning". Her following books were also box office hits. Kondo now has her own series on Netflix in which she cleans up other people's homes using her tried and tested KonMari method.
  3. Raphael Fellmer: After a five-year money strike, the activist Rapahel Fellmer founded several projects at once: foodsharing.de, SirPlus and yunity - and achieved millions in sales with discarded food.
  4. Anna Alex & Julia Bösch: The two founders started Outfittery, an online personal shopping service for men, in 2012. In 2018, Outfittery supplied 500,000 customers worldwide with clothing packages personally put together by an AI and stylist.
  5. Brian Chesky: The co-founder of Airbnb is now one of the richest Americans through the brokerage of private accommodation. He was among the "30 under 30" in 2010 and in 2015, along with his co-founders, was Forbes' "America's Richest Entrepreneurs under 40".
  6. Maxi Knust: In 2015, Maxi Knust created the first online magazine for women founders, FEMPRENEUR, after she was fed up with reports about male founders everywhere. In 2016 she launched the FEMPRENEUR SUMMIT, an event by and for female founders. In 2017, in collaboration with Val Recheeva, the Female Founders Book was published, a handbook for female founders and those who want to become one.
  7. Valentin Stalf & Maximilian Tayenthal: The two Viennese founded Papayer GmbH in 2013, which over the years has developed into the fintech bank N26, the first completely free digital account. Despite some criticism, the direct bank was one of the most valuable German financial start-ups in 2019.
  8. Reese Witherspoon: Until now she was only known as an actress, but since 2013 she has been successfully running the Draper James online marketplace. In 2016, the American began working with her agency Hello Sunshine to put women at the center of the media and pay more attention to their stories. Another joint of the company is Witherspoon's book club, which only reads works by women authors.

8. Inspirational books for entrepreneurs

An entrepreneur has the quality of inspiring others and motivating them for their own business. We therefore recommend the following books for the right mindset:
 

9. What types of entrepreneurship are there?

The "classic" entrepreneur no longer exists, rather it is packed into various subcategories (which can sometimes be broken down into even deeper categories), including the following:

  • Serial / Habitual Entrepreneur: Serial founder who is always looking for the next business idea and starts several companies. While this happens one after the other with the serial entrepreneur, the time windows of his start-up projects overlap with the habitual entrepreneur.
  • Young / Senior Entrepreneur: Founder based on age. A senior entrepreneur has a lot of professional and life experience, while a young entrepreneur is often fresh out of college.
  • Fempreneur: Founder who asserts herself in male entrepreneurship.
  • Mompreneur / Dadpreneur: One parent looks after the offspring full-time and sets up a small business (mostly from home).
  • Regional entrepreneur: Entrepreneurs who focus on the characteristics of their region in their business ideas.
  • Social / Eco Entrepreneur: Eco entrepreneurs are increasingly concentrating on environmental protection and sustainability, social entrepreneurs solve social problems. Social and eco entrepreneurship are two different forms of entrepreneurship, but very often overlap. The best example: fair trade drinks in sustainable packaging.
  • High-tech entrepreneur: Everything revolves around innovation. It is also characteristic that high-tech entrepreneurs need comparatively large sums of money to implement their business ideas.

In addition to the subspecies of an entrepreneur, there are also special locations where entrepreneurial thinking is required and encouraged:

  • Intrapreneur: With intrapreneurship, employees are given skills and leeway like a "real" entrepreneur in order to promote entrepreneurial thinking and bring fresh ideas into the business.
  • Entrepreneur in Residence (EIR): This is where the American practice differs from the German practice. In the US, EIR are seasoned entrepreneurs who work at VCs to start something new within the company's ecosystem. In Germany, on the other hand, an entrepreneur in residence is a prospective self-employed person who is practically completing an internship as an entrepreneur in a start-up and going through all departments. Here, the entrepreneur in residence is prepared for his own planned independence. Entrepreneurs in residence in this country are mostly university graduates with no professional experience, but with fresh ideas, or creative career changers.

10. Your first steps on the way to business

An entrepreneur motivates and inspires, but the majority of the self-employed are of course "normal" entrepreneurs. Let several hundred business ideas from various industries convince you to become a founder. With a business model canvas, you can later bring structure to your idea - or you can use our online solution Unternehmerheld to write a free business plan that will convince banks and investors.

Let's go: take the founder test!

Do you have what it takes to be an entrepreneur? With our free start-up test you can find out whether you have the start-up gene. So you know right from the start what your strengths and weaknesses are and what your chances of a successful start-up are.

To summarize again ...

In the literal sense, an entrepreneur is simply an entrepreneur. However, the term entrepreneur in today's context goes far beyond the actual function as owner or managing director. An entrepreneur is, for example, characterized by:

  • Ideas that are ahead of their time
  • a disruptive personality
  • a great feeling for innovation

No, because an entrepreneur sets himself apart from a "normal" founder, for example with a classic business idea, because of his innovative spirit and personality.

The line to become an entrepreneur is vague, but there are a few things that suggest that you are not "just" a founder, but an entrepreneur:

  • A great deal of self-confidence
  • A can-do attitude
  • Spirit of innovation
  • An idea that is ahead of its time

In the classic sense, or derived from French ("entre" and "prendre", ie "to undertake"), means entrepreneurEntrepreneur

  • A healthy dose of self-confidence is a must.
  • Dare to plunge into the unknown!
  • Let yourself be inspired.
  • Write down your vision and stay tuned.
  • Define milestones and goals for your business.
  • Just start!

This is where the American practice differs from the German one. In the US, EIR are seasoned entrepreneurs who work at VCs to start something new within the company's ecosystem. In Germany, on the other hand, an entrepreneur in residence is a prospective self-employed person who is practically completing an internship as an entrepreneur in a start-up and going through all departments. Here, the entrepreneur in residence is prepared for his own planned independence. Entrepreneurs in residence in this country are mostly university graduates without professional experience, but with fresh ideas, or creative career changers.

Author: Für-Gründer.de editors

As editor-in-chief, René Klein has been responsible for the content of the portal and all publications by Für-Gründer.de for over 10 years. He is a regular interlocutor in other media and writes numerous external specialist articles on start-up topics. Before his time as editor-in-chief and co-founder of Für-Gründer.de, he advised listed companies in the field of financial market communication.