Which vitamins are good for my skin

Vitamins for the skin

Which vitamins are good for the skin?

The most important skin vitamins are vitamins A, B3, C, E and H. They have different effects: for example, there are vitamins for pure skin, vitamins that can smooth out fine lines and those that keep the skin elastic.

In the following you can find out more about the most important vitamins for the skin and their effects:

Vitamins for the skin: vitamin A.

Effect on the skin: Vitamins Against Wrinkles? Vitamin A (more precisely: retinol) should actually be able to smooth small wrinkles around the eyes. It is converted into vitamin A acid (retinoic acid or tretinoin) in the skin and then supports the skin's elasticity. Vitamin A preparations are also used for acne, especially those with the active ingredient isotretinoin (a derivative of vitamin A acid). It helps against pimples and blackheads.

What happens in the event of a deficiency? A lack of vitamin A can manifest itself, among other things, in thickening (cornification) of the skin.

Recommended daily amount (according to DGE): According to the German Nutrition Society (DGE), the recommended intake for vitamin A for adolescents aged 15 and over and adults is between 0.8 and 1.1 milligrams per day.

Contained in: Sweet potatoes, carrots, liver sausage, spinach, kale, eggs, Gouda cheese, etc.

Vitamins for the skin: vitamin C.

Effect on the skin: Studies have shown that vitamin C can help the skin produce more proteins and break them down more slowly. This improves the surface structure of the skin and makes it more elastic. In addition, vitamin C is a so-called radical scavenger (antioxidant) - it can "defuse" aggressive oxygen compounds (free radicals) that damage cells.

What happens in the event of a deficiency? A severe deficiency in vitamin C leads to what is known as "seafarer's disease" scurvy. Symptoms of this deficiency disease show up on the skin, among other things: bleeding, poor wound healing and rough / flaky, brown skin.

Recommended daily amount (according to DGE): The “normal” average daily requirement of adults is 95 to 110 milligrams per day.

Contained in: Acerola cherries, rose hips, lemon, broccoli, bell pepper, orange etc.

Vitamins for the skin: vitamin E.

Effect on the skin:According to studies, vitamin E, which is found in high doses in some skin creams, can help repair damaged and dry skin and make it more elastic. Because of its fat solubility, vitamin E can penetrate the cornea and be stored there. It should also be well tolerated in high doses. Vitamin E concentrations of up to five percent are usually found in cosmetics.

A high vitamin E content in the skin has many advantages, it ...

  • ... improves the moisture level of the horny layer.
  • ... smoothes small wrinkles.
  • ... increases the skin's resistance to harmful environmental influences.
  • ... protects the skin from UV rays (the sun protection of vitamin E is up to SPF 10 depending on the concentration).
  • ... improves wound healing after operations and reduces scarring.
  • ... inhibits inflammation and counteracts skin aging and age spots.

What happens in the event of a deficiency? If the skin or the organism receives too little vitamin E, the fat and moisture balance is disturbed in the long run. The skin becomes dry.

Recommended daily amount (according to DGE): According to the German Nutrition Society (DGE), the recommended intake for vitamin E for adolescents aged 15 and over and adults is between 11 and 15 milligrams per day.

Contained in: Wheat germ, sunflower and olive oil, raspberries, savoy cabbage, tomatoes, almonds etc.

Vitamins for the skin: vitamin B (biotin, B3)

Effect on the skin:Biotin is one of the water-soluble B vitamins and is also called vitamin H or vitamin B7. It is known for its protective function of skin and hair: Among other things, biotin promotes the growth of the sebum glands and supports the skin's own regeneration processes by ensuring smooth cell growth and division.

Vitamin B3, also known as nicotinic acid or niacin, is still relatively new in skin care cosmetics. It is important for the metabolism of proteins, fats and carbohydrates, supports the cellular energy metabolism and, thanks to its antioxidant effect, is important for the regeneration of the skin.

What happens in the event of a deficiency? If too little biotin is absorbed over a long period of time, the skin can become dry and flaky. One consequence of niacin deficiency is dermatitis, an inflammation of the skin.

Recommended daily amount (according to DGE): Adolescents aged 15 and over and adults should consume 30 to 60 micrograms (µg) biotin and 11 to 16 milligrams (mg) niacin per day.

Contained in: Liver, legumes, nuts, mushrooms, spinach etc. (applies to biotin). Fish, dairy products, poultry, eggs, etc. (applies to niacin).