What are the differences between Alabamians and Tennesseans

Demonym - Demonym

Name for an inhabitant of a place

A. demonymous (/ dɛ m ə n ɪ m /; from ancient Greek δῆμος, DeMOS , "People, tribe" and ὄνυμα, Onuma , "Names") or gentilic (from Latin gentilis "a clan or gen") is a word that identifies a group of people (residents, residents, natives) in relation to a particular location. Demonyms are usually derived from the name of the place (hamlet, village, town, city, region, province, state, continent). Demonyms are used to refer to all persons (the general population) of a particular place, regardless of any ethnic, linguistic, religious or other cultural differences that may exist within the population of that place. Examples of demonyms are Cochabambino for someone from the city of Cochabamba; American for a person from the United States of America; and Swahili for a person from the Swahili coast.

The study of demonyms is a branch of anthroponymy Demonymy or Called demonymics .

Since they refer to territorially defined groups of people, demonyms differ semantically from ethnonyms (names of ethnic groups). There are many polysemic words in the English language that have multiple meanings (including demonymic and ethonymic uses), and therefore a particular use of such a word depends on the context. For example, the word Thai can be used as a demonym that denotes any resident of Thailand, while the same word can also be used as an ethnonym that denotes members of the Thai people. Conversely, some groups of people can be associated with several demonyms. For example, a native of the United Kingdom may have one British person , a Briton or informal one To be called British .

Some demonyms can have multiple meanings. For example, the demonym Macedonians to the population of North Macedonia or, more generally, to the entire population of the region Macedonia of which a significant part is located in Greece. In some languages, a demonym can be borrowed from another language as a nickname or descriptive adjective for a group of people: for example, will Québécois , Québécoise (female) Often used in English for a native of the province or city of Quebec (though) Quebecer , Quebecker are also available.

In English, demonyms are always capitalized. Often they are the same as the adjective form of the place, e.g. B. Egyptian , Japanese or Greek generally for locations in Europe, although there are some exceptions; for example is the adjectival form of Spain Spanish , but who is demonymous Spaniards .

English often uses national demonyms such as Ethiopian or Guatemalan while using local demonyms like Chicagoan , Okie or Paris is less common. Many local demonyms are seldom used, and many places, especially smaller towns, lack an overall commonly used and accepted demonym. In practice, the demonym for states, provinces or cities is often simply the name of the place treated as an adjective. For example Kennewick Man .

  • 1 etymology
  • 2 List of adjective and demonym forms for countries and nations
  • 3 List of adjectives and demonyms for cities
  • 4 suffixing
    • 4.1 - (at
    • 4,2 -ian
    • 4,3 -anian
    • 4,4 -nian
    • 4,5- in (e)
    • 4,6 -a (ñ / n) o / a, -e (ñ / n) o / a or -i (ñ / n) o / a
    • 4,7 -ite
    • 4.8 - (e) r
    • 4,9 - (i) sh
    • 4,10 -ene
    • 4,11 -ensian
    • 4.12 -ard
    • 4.13 -ese, -nese or -lese
    • 4,14 -i (e) or -i (ya)
    • 4,15 -iot or -iote
    • 4,16 -k
    • 4,17 -asque
    • 4.18 - (we) gian
    • 4,19 -onian
    • 4,20 -vian
    • 4,21 -ois (e), -ais (e)
    • 4.22 From Latin or Latinization
  • 5 prefixing
  • 6 Non-standardized examples
  • 7 demonyms and ethnonyms
  • 8 fiction
  • 9 See also
  • 10 notes
  • 11 references
  • 12 sources
  • 13 External links

etymology

National Geographic writes the term Demonym to Merriam-Webster editor Paul Dickson in a recent 1990 paper. The word was not found in the Merriam-Webster Collegiate Dictionary or in popular manuals such as the Chicago Manual of Style . With that in mind, it was suggested by Dickson in his 1997 book Labels for locals made popular . In what do you call a person from ...? A dictionary of resident names (the first edition of Labels for locals ) Dickson wrote the term George H. Scheetz in his Names' Names: A Descriptive and Prescriptive Onymicon (1988), in which the term appears to appear for the first time. The term can be designed according to demonymic , the the Oxford English Dictionary defined as the name of an Athenian citizen after the deme to which the citizen belongs, with his first deployment traced back to 1893.

List of adjective and demonym forms for countries and nations

List of adjectives and demonyms for cities

Suffixation

Several linguistic elements are used to create demonyms in the English language. Most often, a suffix is ​​added at the end of the site name, which is changed slightly in some cases. These can resemble late Latin, Semitic, Celtic, or Germanic suffixes, such as

-(a

Continents and regions

countries

Member states, provinces and regions

Cities

-ian

countries

Member states, provinces, regions and cities

-anian

-nian

-in (e)

-a (ñ / n) o / a, -e (ñ / n) o / a or -i (ñ / n) o / a

Adaptation, as from the standard Spanish suffix -en (n / n) O (sometimes a permanent use -a instead of -O for a woman, according to the Spanish suffix standard -en (n / n) a )

Countries and regions

Cities

-ite

  • Akron → Akronites
  • Andhra - Andhrites
  • Ann Arbor → Ann Arborites
  • Austin → Austinites
  • Baku → Bakuvites
  • Bergen County, New Jersey → Bergenites
  • Boulder → Boulderites
  • Brisbane → Brisbanites (also " Brisbanian ")
  • Bronx → Bronxite
  • Brooklyn → Brooklynites
  • Carson City, Nevada → Carsonites
  • Chennai → Chennaiites
  • Dallas → Dallasites
  • Decatur → Decaturite
  • Delhi → Delhites
  • Denton, Texas → Dentonite
  • Denver → Denverites
  • Dhaka → Dhakaites (more often " Dhakaiya ")
  • Dubai → Dubaiites
  • Dunedin → Dunedinites
  • Durban → Durbanites
  • Erie, Pennsylvania → Erieiten
  • Gaya → Gayaites
  • Guelph → Guelphites
  • Irmo, South Carolina → Irmiten
  • Israel → Israelites (depending on usage also " Israeli "; see below)
  • Istanbul → Istanbulites
  • Jerusalem → Jerusalemites
  • Karachi → Karachiites
  • Kerala → Keralites
  • Kweyol → Kweyolites
  • Manhattan → Manhattanites
  • Mon State → Monites
  • Moscow → Muscovites (also Latin " Muscovia “)
  • Montpelier, Vermont → Montpelierites
  • Mumbai → Mumbaiites, Mumbaikars
  • New Hampshire → New Hampshirites
  • Norman, Oklahoma → Normanites
  • Oban → Obanites
  • Odessa → Odessites
  • Pahang → Pahangite (also Pahangese )
  • Patna → Patnaites
  • Penang → Penangit
  • Perth → Perthites (also " Perthian " and " Perthling ")
  • Pullman → Pullmanites
  • Putney → Putneyites
  • Queens → queens
  • Reading → Readingites
  • Reno, Nevada → Renoites
  • Ruskin, Florida → Ruskinites
  • Saint Paul, Minnesota → Saint Paulites
  • Seattle → Seattleites
  • Seoul → Seoulites
  • Shiloh → Shilonites (as in: " Ahijah the Shilonite ")
  • Shillong → Shillongite (also " Nong Shillong " and " Nong Sor ")
  • Spokane → Spokanites
  • Sydney → Sydneyites (also " Sydneysider ")
  • Telangana → Telanganites
  • Tokyo → Tokyoites
  • Vancouver → Vancouverites
  • Vizag → Vizagites
  • Warangal → Warangalites
  • Wenham, Massachusetts → Wenhamites
  • Westchester County, New York → Westchesterites
  • Whittier, California → Whittierites
  • Winston-Salem → Winston-Salemites
  • Wisconsin → Wisconsinites
  • Wrexham → Wrexhamites
  • Wyoming → Wyomingites
  • Yangon → Yangonites

- (e) r

Often used for European and Canadian locations

- (i) sh

(Usually appended to a truncated form of the toponym or place name.)

"-ish" is usually only correct as an adjective. See note below list.

-ene

Often used for locations in the Middle East and Europe.

-ensian

  • Inverness (UK) → Invernessians
  • Kingston-upon-Hull (Great Britain) → Hullensians
  • Leeds (UK) → Leodensians
  • Reading (UK) → Readingensianer

-ard

-ese, -nese or -lese