You can create a website with Scratch

University of Cologne

General requirements:

  • You should be 10 to 12 years old.
  • You should be interested in programming.

Technical requirements

  • To take this course, you will need a computer or laptop with an internet connection.
  • Before you can get started with Scratch, you must first create an account. To do this, visit the website: https://scratch.mit.edu/ and click on "Become a scratcher" in the upper right corner. Here you have to choose a username and create your own password. (Tip: do not use your real name!) Afterwards you can create your own projects under “Develop”.
  • Printer, preferably in color

 

Components of the course:

Part 1

  
 
  • pdf file "Instructions from Minti Mint: Cat racing game" - preferably as a color printout
 
 
  • pdf file "Changes in the functions" - preferably as a printout
 

Part 2

 
  • "Car racing" pdf file - ideally as a color printout
 
 
  • pdf file "Changes in the functions"
 

 

Procedure for processing:

Part 1:

You can program your own computer game using the instructions from Minti Mint. This game is about controlling a mouse over a racetrack.

  1. Sign up for Scratch and take a look at everything to get a first impression.
  2. Open the educational game "Scratch in 5 Minutes" and watch it to get an overview of all the important functions. You can find the link above under “Components of the course” (or in Minti Mint's instructions).
  3. Open the instructions from Minti Mint for the "racing game cat", print them out (preferably in color) and follow them by following all the steps in Scratch. Please pay attention to the pdf file "Changes in the functions".
  4. When you have worked through the booklet to the end, you have programmed your own racing game. Congratulations!

Part 2:

  1. Open the car racing starter project at: https://scratch.mit.edu/projects/132611807/ Alternatively, you can draw the race track and the cars yourself, as you learned from Minti Mint.
  2. Open the instructions "Car Racing" and follow the instructions at Scratch to program your own car race with Scratch. Please also note the pdf file "Changes in the functions".

If you have any questions about processing, it is best to write us an email.

 

Stamp for the KinderUni diploma:

With this course you can get a total of 4 stamps for:

  • Part 1: Instructions from Minti Mint for the racing game cat: 2 stamps
  • Part 2: Car racing: 2 stamps

You will receive the stamp when you send us your work results. These are for this course:

  • Part 1: Link to your racing game cat
  • Part 2: Link to your car race

Either by email or by post to the address at the bottom of the page. Please don't forget us your mailing address so that we can send you your stamps.

You put your stamp in your study book. If you have collected 10 stamps or more, you can contact us and send us your study book, because you will then also have a Children's University Diploma get from us.

If you don't already have a Study book contact us by email and write us your address. We will then send it to you. You then write your name on the front and the title (or an abbreviation) of the KinderUni course in the blank lines on the inside. Then stick your stamp next to the title.

 

Our address:

Cologne Children's University
University of Cologne
Albertus-Magnus-Platz
50923 Cologne

children's universityuni-koeln.de

 

Dear Children's University students!

Computers, smartphones, tablets, the internet - all of this is part of everyday life for us these days. And yet only a few peek behind the facade, so look at how the whole thing actually works. And all of this is not so easy at all, but rather the result of years of, often even decades, research. In addition to the other natural sciences such as mathematics, physics and chemistry, computer science plays a central role in this.

Computer science consists of a large number of sub-disciplines, including practical computer science. And here programming, i.e. the development of software, is a central issue. There are many different languages ​​for this, and you've probably heard of one or the other such as Java, C or Python. But there are also languages ​​that were developed primarily to make programming as easy as possible. This also includes "scratch".

In the following exercises, you will bring animals such as crocodiles, snails or unicorns to life and chase them down a racetrack. And by the way, you will learn how to program. Working with Scratch is particularly easy, by the way, because you put the program together from small blocks that are almost self-explanatory. In this way you not only learn how programming works in general, but in the end you will even have written your own little computer game. You can publish this on a website and demonstrate it to your family or friends.

I wish you a lot of fun with the creative design, testing and programming!

Dear Children's University students!

Computers, smartphones, tablets, the internet - all of this is part of everyday life for us these days. And yet only a few peek behind the facade, so look at how the whole thing actually works. And all of this is not so easy at all, but rather the result of years of, often even decades, research. In addition to the other natural sciences such as mathematics, physics and chemistry, computer science plays a central role.

Computer science consists of a large number of sub-disciplines, including practical computer science. And here programming, i.e. the development of software, is a central issue. There are many different languages ​​for this, and you've probably heard of one or the other such as Java, C or Python. But there are also languages ​​that were developed primarily to make programming as easy as possible. This also includes "scratch".

In the following exercises, you will bring animals such as crocodiles, snails or unicorns to life and chase them down a racetrack. And by the way, you will learn how to program. Working with Scratch is particularly easy, by the way, because you put the program together from small blocks that are almost self-explanatory. In this way you not only learn how programming works in general, but in the end you will even have written your own little computer game. You can publish this on a website and demonstrate it to your family or friends.

I wish you a lot of fun with the creative design, testing and programming!

Dipl.-Wirt.-Inf. Patrick Wood
University of Cologne
Regional data center Cologne