Mehtas also come to Punjabi

Aditya Mehta
birthday31st October 1985 (age 35)[1]
place of birthMaharashtra
nationalityIndiaIndia
Nickname (s)The Star of India[2]
professional2008/09, 2011–2018
Prize money161.833 £[1]
Highest break147[1](Paul Hunter Classic 2014)[3]
Century breaks41[1]
Main tour successes
World championships
Ranking tournament victories
Minor tournament victories
World rankings
Highest WRL place49 (May – June, August – November 2014, February – March 2015)[4][5][6][7][8][9][10][11]

Aditya Snehal Mehta (Born October 31, 1985 in Maharashtra) is an Indian snooker player.[12] Between 2008 and 2018 he played a total of 8 years as a professional on the Snooker Main Tour.

Career

Beginnings and first year as a professional

Aditya Mehta started playing snooker when she was 12 years old. He first drew international attention as a youth at the U21 World Cup, where he advanced to the main tournament in 2003. At the U21 Asian Cup the following year, he reached the semi-finals. In the following tournaments he reached the quarter-finals and in the Indian national championship he was in the semi-finals of the seniors at the age of 19. After defeating players like Jamie Jones, Tian Pengfei and Mark Allen, he also took part in the Challenge Tour this season to qualify for the professional tour. But he remained without a win and gave up the attempt. For India he joined the Asian Games in 2006 and won the bronze medal in the team. In addition, his own successes failed to materialize and so he took a break in 2007.[13] In December he went back to the national championship and reached the final, which he lost to Pankaj Advani. At the Asian Cup in 2008, he managed to win the revenge against Advani in the semifinals. In the final he was defeated 3: 7 against the Chinese Jin Long, whom he had defeated 4: 0 in the preliminary round. Although he missed the direct Main Tour qualification, but as runner-up he was nominated by the Asian Association for the 2008/09 professional season.

He lost the first two games in his first year as a professional, but at the 2008 Grand Prix he reached the third round with victories over Patrick Wallace and David Morris and achieved the highest tournament break with 140 points. He was able to repeat the result at the Welsh Open and the China Open. Nevertheless, it was only enough for 84th place in the snooker world rankings and thus not for staying on the tour.

He then tried direct re-qualification via the Pontin’s International Open Series (PIOS), but in 8 tournaments he only reached the round of 16 and only a midfield place in the overall standings. He also did not make it to the finals at the international amateur tournaments. For this he reached the final with the team at the Asian Games 2010 and got silver, in the individual he won the bronze medal. But he stayed in England and took part in the Players Tour Championship (PTC), which was the successor to the PIOS tournaments. His best result was reaching the third round in Sheffield with a 4-0 victory over world number six Stephen Maguire. The following year he missed the direct tour qualification for a second time when he lost his second final at the Asian Cup to Passakorn Suwannawat 3-7. And for the second time he got the wildcard of the Asian Association and thus returned to the Main Tour for the 2011/12 season. In the same year he also won the 78th Indian national championships in Chennai with a 6-2 win against the 13-time champion Alok Kumar.[14][15]

Another professional career

Mehta celebrated his first win in his second professional season at the Paul Hunter Classic 2011 with 4-1 against Ryan Day. Against Day, he then missed his first entry into a main tournament at the Shanghai Masters, having made it into the final qualifying round for the first time. But he had his greatest success at the Antwerp Open, a tournament in the PTC series without qualification. He defeated, among others, the local hero Luca Brecel and then the world number 14. Matthew Stevens and got to the quarterfinals. Then he reached round 3 of the China Open. There were many more tournaments than in his first year and he was often eliminated in round 1, which is why he again missed the direct further qualification. For this he returned to the Asian Amateurs Championship and reached the final for the third time and for the second time in a row. This time he won against his compatriot Advani 7: 5 and was able to continue his professional career by winning the title. In his third year he made it into the fourth qualifying round twice, at the Wuxi Classic and again at the Shanghai Masters, but then dropped out against Jamie Cope and Mark King respectively. In Round 4 of the International Championship, he took revenge against Cope and thus for the first time entered the main round of a major ranking tournament. In Chengdu he also won against the world number 16. He and Stuart Bingham made it to the round of 16. Other smaller successes in the season were the round of 16 in the special format 6-Red World Championship and twice the entry into round 3 of PTC tournaments. He achieved a particular success off the tour at the 2013 World Games: He was in the final against Liang Wenbo and won the gold medal in the individual.

In the 2013/14 season he was unable to build on the previous year's success. At the Paul Hunter Classic he then made it to the round of 16. A little later, with the Indian Open, another ranking tournament took place in India for the first time. In his home tournament he defeated another top 16 player with Mark Williams in the round of 16, then decided the Indian duel against Pankaj Advani for himself and with a hard-fought 4: 3 against number 5 in the ranking Stephen Maguire he reached his first professional final. He then lost that against Ding Junhui, who gave him no chance in his 5-0 win with four breaks of over 80 points. In the other tournaments he usually survived the first round, but was then regularly eliminated. He was only more successful in the lower-quality PTC tournaments: he reached the eighth finals at the Paul Hunter Classic and the quarter-finals at the Antwerp Open. After all, he qualified in the two-year ranking of the world rankings for the first time directly for the next season, which he started in 49th place. In 2014/15 he was initially particularly successful in the PTC tournaments. He reached the round of 16 at the Riga Open and the Lisbon Open. At the Paul Hunter Classic he was eliminated in the third round against Stephen Maguire, but in the match he was the first player from India to achieve an official maximum break. In the major ranking tournaments, he came into the round of 32 twice, at the Welsh Open, where he beat the then world number five, Barry Hawkins, and at the Indian Open. With that he could not improve, but he could hold his top 64 position.

It looked different the following year. Up until the end of 2015 he won all the opening games except the Shanghai Masters, but then only made it into round 3 once. In early 2016, he became Indian champion again. He lost his first game again at the German Masters in February and then had to cancel his participation in the last four ranking tournaments of the season due to persistent neck problems.[16] That cost him his place in the top 64. But due to his consistent points at the European PTC tournaments, even without great results, he came under the 8 best of the Order of Merit and thus immediately got a tour card for the next two years. However, it was not until September that he was able to get fully back into the game, and first of all he lost the first four games, two of them to zero. At the International Championship he won two matches for the first time. He also won other individual matches and defeated top players such as Ryan Day and Barry Hawkins, but had to improve significantly in the following year in order to get high enough in the world rankings. The first success in the 2017/18 season was the third round at the European Masters, after which he even reached the round of 16 at the English Open. In addition, there were far too many defeats in the beginning and also the third round at the Gibraltar Open, the tournament with the second lowest ranking, did not bring him further than 83rd place. At 32 years of age and after a total of 8 years as a professional, he dropped out again Tour and then stopped competing in the Q School to regain his place.

Personal

Aditya Mehta was one of the few snooker players who played with glasses. But now he uses contact lenses.

successes

Ranking tournaments:

Other professional tournaments:

Amateur tournaments:

Team competitions (for India)

  • Silver medal: Asian Games (2010), Asian Indoor and Martial Arts Games (2013)
  • Bronze Medal: Asian Games (2006)

Web links

Individual evidence

  1. abcdAditya Mehta at CueTracker (As of May 25, 2019)
  2. Aditya Mehta. In: worldsnooker.com.World Professional Billiards & Snooker Association, January 11, 2015, accessed July 23, 2015.
  3. ↑ Mehta 147 / O'Sullivan In Form (Memento from August 23, 2014 in Internet Archive)
  4. Prize Money Rankings. (PDF; 193 kB) After The World Championship 2014. (No longer available online.) In: worldsnooker.com.World Professional Billiards & Snooker Association, archived from the original on July 23, 2015; accessed on July 23, 2015.
  5. World Rankings. (PDF; 197 kB) After The Riga Open 2014 (ET1). (No longer available online.) In: worldsnooker.com.World Professional Billiards & Snooker Association, August 11, 2014, archived from the original on July 23, 2015; accessed on July 23, 2015.
  6. World Rankings. (PDF; 197 kB) After The Paul Hunter Classic 2014 (ET2). (No longer available online.) In: worldsnooker.com.World Professional Billiards & Snooker Association, August 27, 2014, archived from the original on July 23, 2015; accessed on July 23, 2015.
  7. World Rankings. (PDF; 196 kB) After The Shanghai Masters 2014. (No longer available online.) In: worldsnooker.com.World Professional Billiards & Snooker Association, September 15, 2014, archived from the original on July 23, 2015; accessed on July 23, 2015.
  8. World Rankings. (PDF; 196 kB) After The Bulgarian Open 2014 (ET3). (No longer available online.) In: worldsnooker.com.World Professional Billiards & Snooker Association, October 6, 2014, archived from the original on July 23, 2015; accessed on July 23, 2015.
  9. World Rankings. (PDF; 217 kB) After The Haining Open 2014 (AT2). (No longer available online.) In: worldsnooker.com.World Professional Billiards & Snooker Association, October 28, 2014, archived from the original on July 23, 2015; accessed on July 23, 2015.
  10. World Rankings. (PDF; 260 kB) After The German Masters 2015. (No longer available online.) In: worldsnooker.com.World Professional Billiards & Snooker Association, February 8, 2015, archived from the original on July 13, 2015; accessed on July 23, 2015.
  11. World Rankings. (PDF; 260 kB) After The Betvictor Welsh Open 2015. (No longer available online.) In: worldsnooker.com.World Professional Billiards & Snooker Association, February 22, 2015, archived from the original on July 12, 2015; accessed on July 23, 2015.
  12. ↑ Player profile on World Games 2013. Accessed July 28, 2013.
  13. ↑ Pradeep Vijayakar: Aditya Mehta all set for Pro Snooker. In: Cue Sports India. August 7, 2008, accessed April 10, 2016.
  14. Indian National Billiards & Snooker Championship 2011. cuesportsindia.com. Retrieved November 16, 2011.
  15. Aditya Mehta claimed his Maiden National Snooker Title by defeating Alok Kumar. jagranjosh.com. Retrieved November 16, 2011.
  16. Aditya Mehta Resigns From Tour. In: worldsnooker.com.World Professional Billiards & Snooker Association, February 29, 2016, accessed April 10, 2016.